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FROM THE LIBRARY OF 



REV. LOUIS FITZGERALD BENSON. D. D 



BEQUEATHED BY HIM TO 



THE LIBRARY OF 



PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 









Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Princeton Theological Seminary Library 



http://archive.org/details/happylifeOOeddy 



ffi Of Ptitic?. 



FEB 27 1934 












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Songs of Happy Life 



FOR SCHOOLS 
HOMES AND 

BANDS OF MERCY 



Compiled by Sarah J. Eddy 
Second Edition. 



Art and Nature Study Publishing Co. 
Providence, R. I. 

1S9S 



COPTRIGHT, 1897, 
BY 

Sarah J. Kddt. 



Copyright secured in England. 



f. H. OILSON COMPANY 

PRINTERS AND BOOKBINDERS 

BOSTON, O. S. A. 



This collection of So?igs of Happy Life is dedicated 
to all noble and earnest touts who wish to add to tin 
beauty of the world, and to the joyful life of all 
creatures. ........ 



PREFACE TO SEOOKD EDITION. 



This collection is designed as a supplementary Song-Book for use in Schools, aa well 
as intended for Homes and Hands of Mercy. It contains a number of songs suitable for 
"Arbor Day' 1 and "Bird Day"* exercises.* The soul;-- have been selected withgreal 
care. Valuable help and suggestions have been given, and the music has all been exam- 
ined and approved by .Mr. Emory P. Russell, Director of Music in the Public Schools 
of Providence, I!. [., and Superintendent of the Summer School of the American [nsti- 
tute of Normal Methods. 

II. A. Clark*'. Mus. D., Professor of the Science of Music in the University of 
Pennsylvania, has also examined and approved of the book. 

The editor is indebted to Miss Fanny L. Weaver who has assisted in the prepara- 
tion and arrangement of the music. 

Poems have been written especially for this book by Miss Mary E. Wilkin 8, Miss 
Jane Campbell, and Miss Sarah C. Padelford, and by Messrs. Win. W . Caldwell and 
Win. J. Long. 

Original music has been written by Dr. Hugh A. Clarke, by Messrs. Leonard B. 

Mar-hall. lanorv P. Russell, Ceo. II. Lonias, Paul Ambrose, and Win. L. Clover, and 
by Misses Kate s. Chittenden and Hattie M. Vose, by Mrs. Alice Pitman Wesley and 
Mr-. Elizabeth Mitchell Allen. 

A number of poems by Mrs. Celia Thaxter, Miss Edith M. Thomas, Miss Emilie 

Poulsson, and others have for the firsl time been set to ninsic. 

Cordial thanks ar<' extended to Mrs. Emily Huntington Miller, Mrs. Margaret 
J. Preston, and Mrs. Daniel Lothrop. and to Misses Edith M. Thomas, Emilie Poulsson, 
Augusta Lamed, Amey D. Fogg, Anna II. Branch and Caroline Hazard for permission 
to use poems \\ ritten by them. 

For selections from the •• Riverside Song-Book," and poem- from »« Voices for the 
Speechless " and from «« Stories and Poems for Children " by Celia Thaxter. all of which 
are published by Houghton, Mifflin & Co., grateful acknowledgement is hereby made, 
and special thanks are due for the generous assistance thus given. 

Thanks are also due to Rev. < 'harles W. Wendte, to A. C. Mc( 'lurg & ( 'o.. of ( Ihicago, 

• The United States Department of Agriculture has Issued a circular recommending that an annual 
"Bird Day'" be established in the public schools in the United states. Bee page 179. 

(4) 



PBEFACK 

to Mr. (ico. T. Angell for use of words from his " Band of Mercy Melodies," and to 
Mrs. Florence Ilorutia Suckling for poems from "The Humane Educator and Reciter. 11 

The publishers of the English " Band of Mercy Melodies " have kindly allowed the 
use of a number of songs from their collection. 

Arrangements have been made with Messrs. Oliver Ditson Company for the use of 
selections from " Childrens 1 School Songs, 1 ' and other publications. 

The latter part of the book contains quotations from various authors, showing the 
importance and benefit of humane education and of the study of nature, and giving infor- 
mation in regard to Bands of Mercy, with suggestions as to entertainments to be given 
in schools and Bands of Mercy, and a list of publications that will be found useful for 
reference 

It also contains specimens of musical notes which are to be distinguished in the voi- 
ces of birds and other animals, and quotations suitable for a " Bird Day " program. 

In sending forth this volume, an earnest hope goes with it, that the children who sing 
these songs of happy life may rejoice in this beautiful world of sunshine and flowers and 
singing birds, and may enter into loving sympathy with all life, and help to make the 
world more beautiful and joyful for each other and for all the creatures by whom they are 
surrounded. 

December, 1897. S. J.E. 



(5) 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



PART I. 



Title of Song. Author of Words. Composer or Source of Mimic. 

HELP AND KINDNESS TO ALL. 

(Songs SuilabU for (>/j</u'//</ and Closing School, Band of Mercy Meetings, <'<-.) 

Make mi: Would MORE /* ■>• 

Bright Iiev. Thomas Timmins . . Ait. Mendelssohn . . . 

To Work, — Do Your Best Folin Adcock 

Humanity Qisborne Gluck 

Little Sunbeam German Air 



The Hope of i be N ltion . 
Little Deeds of Kindness 
Marching 'Bound the 

World 

Little by Ln m: . . . 
Anniversary Song . . . 
Be Kind to Living Things 

SlNG Always 

Heimdali 



Ursula Tannenforst . . . Mozart 

Anon Hugh A. Clarke, Mus. D. 



Anon F. Abt 

Anon Win. L. Glover . . . 

Mrs. Nash Italian Ilvum .... 

M. A Kidder Hattie M. Vose . . . 

Mary E. Carter M. C. J 

Augusta Lamed {adapted) . Hngh A. Clarke, Mus. D. 

Oh, Scatter Kind Words German 

Dare To 1><> Right . . . Anon J. C. 0. Redington , . 

The R< >8E I- Queen Among 

nn Flowers .... Bev. F. L. Ilosmer . . . . C. W. Wendte . . . 

Speak Kindly Luella Clark Reinecke 

God Bless the Little 

Children Lillie E. Barr G. H. Lomas .... 



17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 



Star O] Mehcy . . . . 
m kRCHiNG Song .... 
Ln i Aloft < mk Banner . 

Hi. Liyi.iii Long Who Lrv- 

r.i ii Wki.i 



C. Fannie Allyn , . 
A. D. Fogg . . . . 
Itev. Thomas Timmins 



Geo. II. Lomas .... 

Adapted from Baruby . . 
Tun.- : •• Glory ! Hallelu- 
jah!" ..:.... 



Arr. by 



25 
26 

27 
28 
29 

30 



II. Bonar Tune -Ward. 

Dr. Mason . . . . 31 

Tunc: '« Ring the Bells of 

Heaven" 81 

Alice Cary (Air: " What's a' the Steer, 

Ki miner?") 82 

Mrs. F. A. /•'. Wood-White . Tune: " Hold the Fort" . 84 

Meriam del Banco .... German 86 

Words adapted from " Our 
Dumb Animals" .... Tune: k< Happy Greeting to 

All" 3(> 

Work, fob the Nighi ts 

Coming Dr. Lowell Mason ... 37 

(6) 



Ring i he Bells of Mercy 

To Mother Fairie . . . 

Vh roRY i> Nigh . . . . 

Little Hands 

Loving-Kindness to All t 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Title of SotiQ. 

Gladly Lend a Hand 
Little Gustava . . 



Author of Words. 
Miss Caroline Hazard . 
Celia Thaxter (adapted ) 



Composer or Source of Music. 



Tune : 
Hu-di 



••Aukl Laug Syne ' 

A. Clarke, Mas. I). 



Page. 
38 

39 



ANIMALS. 



Over in the Meadow . . 

The Chipmunk 

My Cat and Dog. . . . 
A Little Mouse .... 
The Honest Old Toad. . 
The Arab's Farewell to 
His Favorite Steed . . 
Three Kittens . . . . 
The Mountain Goatherd . 
Summer Woods .... 
The Woodmoitse .... 
The Water-Drinkers . . 
The Grey Kitten . . . 



Mrs. Olive A. Wadsworth 

Aimn 

Maori 



Anon 



The Hon. Mrs. Norton 

AttOTl .... 

B. Caldwell . . 

Mary Howitt . . 

Mary Howitt . . 

J. Sajfery . . . 

Jane Campbell . 



Leonard B. Marshal 
Wm. L. Glover . 
Geo. H. Lorn as . 



Geo. H. Lomas . 

John Blockley 
Geo. H. Lomas . 
J. S. Steane 
Leonard B. Marsha 
A. Dawson . . 
T. Crampton . . 
Konradin Kreutzer 



42 

17 
48 
40 
50 

52 
62 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 



BEES AXD OTHER IXSECTS. 



Cunning Bee Anon Wm. L. Glover .... 60 

Tin: Song ok the Bee. . Anon Rev. Alfred Taylor . . . 70 

To a Butterfly .... Jane Taylor Leonard B. Marshall . . 71 

The Cricket From the Latin of Vincent 

Bourne, by Cowper . . . Geo. H. Lomas .... 72 

The Bee Arranged by M lone 73 

The Lady-Bird .... Charlotte Turner Smith . . Alice Pitman Wesley . . 74 



BIRDS. 
(Songs suitable for Bird Day, Arbor Day, etc.) 



Chanticleer . . . 
The Bluebird . . . 

Chick-a-de-dee . . 

To a Redbreast . . 
Dicky-Birds . . . 
The Nightingale. . 
Cradle Tree-Top . 
The Wounded Curlew 
A Cry for Liberty . 
Bird Thoughts . . 

Yellow Bird . . . 
Links i<» a Seabird . 
Don't Kill the Birds 



Celia Thaxter .... 
Emily Huntington Miller. 
Words from " Infants' Mag a 



J. Langhorne 
Anon . . . 
Celia Thaxter 
Wm. J. Long . 
Celia Thaxter 
Anon 
Anon . . . 



Celia Thaxter 
M. A. Stodart 

Daniel C. Colesworthy 



Leonard B. Marshall . 
Leonard B. Marshall . 

James H. Croxall . . 
Geo. H. Lomas . . . 
T. E. Perkins . . . 
From Reichardt . . . 
Hattie M. Vose . . . 
Leonard B. Marshall . 
M. W. Seeley .... 
German Air. Arr. by Geo 

EL Lomas .... 
Leonard B. Marshall . 
Emory P. Russell . . 
Hugh A. Clarke, Mas. B 



70 
80 
81 
82 
B4 
85 

86 
87 
88 
80 



TABLE OF < <>x 1 1:\ / 9. 



Title 0/ Song. 

Spring Song . . . 

ROBEB 1 01 LlNI OLN . 

The Consi w 1 Dove 

The i.i 1 1 11. M uden 

mi: 1. 11 1 1.1: Bird 



Author of Words. 

Sophia 8. Bixby . 
W. 0. Bryant. ' . 



wi> 



Celia Thaxter. . . 

Lydia Maria < 'hild . 



Composer or So '' Paae 

W. W. Gilchrist 90 

Wm. L. Glover .... 92 
Leonard B. Marshall . . 93 



Marjorie 

A n-\\ 11: 1 \ ( Isold's Ques- 

1 1"\ 

The C u.i D Bird's L \mi.\ i 

•• Don r Rob the Birds, 

Boys" 

My Neighbors 

A FINI8HED Nes 1 . . . . 
The Brown Thrush . . 

The Linnet 

The Sparrows 

Our II lppy Secret . . . 
The Bumming- Bird . . . 
The Snow-Bh*d8 . . . . 

Happy Birds 

The V uthful Little Biki> 
1 . 1 1 1 1 \ 1 1 1 r. N 1 :s r . . . . 
The Li 1 1 lb Bird's NTest . 



. . " Little Songs tor Little 

Singers" 94 

Celia Thaxter Hugh A. Clark.-. Mas. 1). 95 



S. /'. Coleridge Geo. II. Lomas . 

Words from the " Animal 
World" . . . 



.... 
Emily Huntington Miller 
Anon .... 
Lucy Larcom . 
Robert Burns 1 adapti d 
< '> lia Thaxter 
Morgan t Sidney. 
Anon .... 
Anon .... 
Anon .... 
Miss Muloch . 
J. II. L. . . . 
Anon .... 



Hat ti.- M. Vose . . 
Leonard B. Marshall 
Paul Ambrose . . 
Leonard B. Marshall 
J. A. Wad man, Sweden 
Paul Ambrose . . 
Alice Pitman Wesley 
T. F. Seward . . . 
T. Crampton . . . 
From B. A. Weber . 
A rr. by Carl Mat/. . 
Air. by J. B. B. . . 
Charlie Hea. Arr. by 
C. M 



NATURE AND SEASONS. 
(Songs suitable for Arbor Day, May Day, etc.) 



The Worshd? of X lture . 
The Song «>i the Dancing 

Waves 

( ' u:\iv \i. o» Spring . . 
E u 11 Li 1 1 lb Flower That 

Opens 

summrb thing8 . . . . 

Lullaby 

Painter of the Fruits 

\ND I- I <>\\ BR8 .... 

Praise June 

Down in the (ins—. . . 
Woodman, Spare That 

Tree 

Spring Blossoms . . . . 
Op in 1 in Morning . . . 
Hidden Treasures . . . 

April Song 

The Day's Eye . . . . 



Whittle r 



Hugh A. Clarke. Mus. D. 



Jane < ■ampbell .... 
Margaret J. Preston . . 

Mrs. C. F. Alexander (ad- 
apted) .... 

Anon 

Arr. by K. D. W. . 

Whit/ ier .... 
Edith M. Thomas . 
Anna //. Branch 

(,, orgt Pope Morris 

Anna 

Anon 

Mary E. Wilkins . 
Edith M. Thomas . 

(8) 



A Swedish Song . . 

Hugh A. Clarke. Mus. 1). 



98 



German Air . 
T. Crampton . 
11. IS. Stedman 



LOO 

in:; 
104 
L06 
II 8 
1 10 
111 
112 
113 
114 
116 

116 



ir 



118 
122 



1LM 
1 25 
126 



Tune: •• Park Street " . , 127 

Wm. L. (Mover .... 128 

Kate s. Chittenden . . . 180 

Johann Adam Hitler . . 181 

Elizabeth Mitchell Allen . 132 

T. L. Perkins .... 184 

Hat tie M. Vose .... 135 

Leonard B. Marshall . ■ 186 
Paul Ambrose . . . .138 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Author of Words. 

Wm. W. Caldwell . 
X S. Dodge . . . 
Emilie Poulsson . . 
Sarah C. Padelford 



Composer or Source of Matte. p lt 



Title of Song. 

a Summer Morning . . 

Hah. ro i in: Rl M. . . 
Aiu'mn Song .... 
I'm: Beautiful Woods 
The North Wind Doth 
Blow Inon Emory P. Russell 



Leonard B. Marshall . 
Hugh A. Clarke. Mus. D. 
Emory P. Russell . . 
Emory P. Russell . . 



L39 

l 10 
142 

143 

144 



LIBERTY, LOVE. AND PEACE. 

( S ujs suilabli for Memorial Day, Washington's Birthday, and similar occasions.} 

Home, Sweet Home . . . 
Song of Liberty . . . 
The Morning Light is 

Breaking 

True Freedom .... 
Our N vtiyk Land . . . 
Liberty, Love, and Peace 
The Watchword .... 

The Fatherland .... 

Closing Hymn .... 



John Howard Payne . . 




i »:. 


Anon 


. Emory P. Russell . . 


146 


a. orge T. An q ell . . . 


. H. Eotzschmar . . . 


147 


Jam* s Russell Lowell . . 


. Geo. II. Lomas . . . 


148 


W. E. Hickson . . . . 


Tune : " America " . 


149 


Charles T. Brooks . . . 


. Tune : •• American Ilvmn ' 


150 


Ursula Tannenforst . . 


. Tune : " The Star Span- 






gled Banner." . . . 


152 


James Russell Loicell . . 


. H. A. Clarke, Mus. D. 


154 


S. T. Coleridge . . . . 


. Dr. L. Mason .... 


155 



PART II. 

HUMANE EDUCATION. 157 

Quotations Concerning the Importance of Humane Education 157 

Methods, — Quotation from M. de Sailly 159 

What Has Been Done in the United States and in England 100 

Bands of Mercy 161 

Baud of Mercy Pledge 162 

Bands of Mercy in Schools 163 

Subjects for Composition 1(54 

List of Publications 164 

OUTLINE OF BAND OF MERCY ENTERTAINMENT. 166 

List of Poems by Standard Authors 178 

BIRD DAY. 179 

Suggestions for Bird Day Program 180 

Interesting Ways to Study the Birds 180 

THE sTUDV OF NATURE. 181 

MUSIC IX NATURE. L85 

MUSICAL NOTES OF BIRDS AND ANIMALS. 188 

(3) 



"The joy in lift' of these animals — indeed of almost all animals and hirds 
in freedom— is very great Sou may see it in every motion: in the lissom 
hound of the hare, the playful leap of the rabbit, the song that the lark and 
the lim-h must sing; the soft loving coo of the dove in the hawthorn; the 

blackbird ruffling out his feathers on a rail. The sense of living the con- 
sciousness "i seeing and feeling — is manifestly intense in them all, and is 
in itself an exquisite pleasure.'' . . . 

" How can words depict the glowing wonder, the marvellous beauty of all 
the plant, the insect, the animal life, which presses upon the mental eye? 
It is impossible. Bui with these that are more immediately around lis — 
with the goldfinch, the caterpillar, the nightingale, the blades of grass, the 
leaves— with these we may feel, into their life we may in part enter, and 
find our own existence thereby enlarged. Would that it were possible for 
the heart and mind to enter into oil the life that glows and teems upon the 
earth -to feel with it, hope with it. sorrow with it — and thereby to become 
a grander, nobler being," — Jiichanl Jefferies. 



(10) 



SONGS OF HAPPY LIFE. 



Make the World More Bright. 

Rev. Thomas Timmins. 



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1. On streets, in liomes,and schools, Be lov-ing, gen- tle,brave ; Be to yourselves and 

2. Stand by the weak and sma ll, And speak up for the right ; Be as God's sunbeams 



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Keep on life's bright,true side ;Spread honor,truth,and kindness round, In peace and love abide. 
In tho'ts and words be true ; And do to others as you would That they should do to you. 

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(11) 



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To Work,— Do Your Best. 



JOHS A t. 



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1. Come, friends,the world wants mending; Let none sit down and rest, But seek to work like 

2. Though yoo can do but lit - tie, That lit -tie's something still ; You'll find a way for 

3. Be kind to those a -round you, To char -i - ty holdfast; Let each think first of 




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Do whatyou can for fel - low-man, 
Nowbrave-ly li.idit for what is right, 

Act as you would that oth - era should 



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And God w iil help you thro' ;Muchmay be done by ev - 'ry one, There's work for all to do. 

Act al-waysun-to you; Much may be done by ev-'ry one, There's work for all to do. 



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1. Turn, turn thy has - ty foot a - side, Nor crush that help - less worm ; 

2. The com-mon Lord of all that move, From whom thy he - ing flowed, 

3. The sun, the moon, the stars lie made To all His creat-ures free; 

4. Let them en - joy their lit - tie day, Their hum - ble bliss re - ceive ; 



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The frame thy scorn - ful thoughts de-ride, From God re- ceived its form, 

A por - tion of His bound-less love On that poor worm be - stowed, 

And spreads o'er earth the grass - y blade, For worms as well as thee, 

Oh ! do not light - ly take a - way The life thou canst not give, 

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A por - tion of His bound-less love On that poor worm be - stowed. 
And spreadso'er earth the grass - y blade, For worms as well as thee. 

Oh! do not light -ly take a - way The life thou canst not give. 

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German Air. 



Joyously. 

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1. Oh, would you be a Ban-beam In this fair world of ours, . . To 

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soshallyou be tru - ly A lit- tie sun- beam bright, To Bhlne with per-f ect 






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lone - ly ones on earth, 

fill your home with light. 

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The Hope of the Nation. 

Tune : " Brightest and Best of the Sons of the Morning. 

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Band our young ar - dor we bring, 

fu - ture its har - vests shall rise; 

world in the years yet to be! 

school and from la - bor we press; 

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Learn - ing and teach - ing the 
Bind - ing all lands in its 
Win for your conn - try a 
Com - rades, u - nite! Mer - cy's 




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les -sons of pit - y, Mer- cy, and kind -ness to each 

peace - ful com-mun - ion, Rip - ened 'neath suns of our own 

true lib - er - a - tion, Mak - ing God's creat-uresmore hap 

ban - ner is o'er us; Creat-ures and men shall our min 



liv-ing thing, 
na-tive skies. 
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is- try bless. 



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Little Deeds of Kindness. 



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Sup - pose 
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the lit - tie dew-drop dp- on the grass should say, "What 

the lit - tu> breez - es Up- on a sum- hut's day Should 

ny deeds of kind -ness A lit - tie child may do, Al - 




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can a lit - tie 

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wants a lov - ing spir 



'lev Would miss its fra - granl smell! How 

ed Be - tore the day was done, With- 

est, And soft - est ones that blow? And 

it, Much more than strength to prove How 



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many a lit - tie 
out a drop to 
think they made a 
„ much a fee - ble 


child would grieve To 
moist - en it. Won 
great mis-take [f 
one may do For 


—n — p=- 3 

y I 

lose it from the 
d with -er in the 
they were talk - ing 
oth - era by her 


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dell ! . 

sun. 
so. . . 
love. . 




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Copyright, 1897, by s. J, Ew>T. 



(16) 



Anon. 



Marching 'Round the World 



F. AbT. 




1. We are marching from the mountains, We are marching o'er the plain, To un - 

2. 'Midst the teem-ing life of mil -lions, In the bus - y marts of trade, We are 

3. You may see our peace-ful ban- ners, They are float-ing near and far, With a 

4. Come and march beneath our ban - ners.They're in ev - 'ry land unfurled ; For 







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do the heav-y bur -dens, Where want and sor - row reign. We're a 

break -ing off the f et - ters, On the dumb and wea - ry laid. We're a 

pledge of Love and Mer - cy, In each gold and sil - ver star. We're a 

Love, and Peace and Mer - cy Shall en - cir - cle all the world. We're a 



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world. 



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Little by Little, 



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the skies grow clear : 
the world -rows strong, 

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Fight-ing the bal -tie of 

r— fs M ^ 


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•_'. Lit - tie 
3. Lit - tie 


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by lit - tie 


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tie, an hour, a day 
tie the days smile out 
tie the Wrong gives way 



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rare is run,Trou-ble and wait-ing 
<l we sow In -to a beau - ti - 
Long - ing souls Struggle up near-er 

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(18) 



Little by Little. 



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Mrs. Nash. 



Anniversary Song. 



Italian Hymn. 



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1 . With ban - ner 

2. These.then, the 



and with song, 
words Ave bear 



We come a 
Up - on onr 



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to - night The birth of this 
and peace. Oh, may we all 

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our band 

u - nite 

IS 


Which seeks through- 
In mer - cy 

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(19) 



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10 



Be Kind to Living Things, 



M. A. Kidder. 
Andantino. 



II v i i ii. M. VOSE. 



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Lit - tie chil - dren, bright and fair,Blessed with ev-'ry need - fnl care, Al-ways 



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Kind not on- ly to our friends, They on whom onr life de - pends; Kind not 
For re -mem -her that the fly, Just as much as us or I, Is the 



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on - ly to the poor, 
work of that great Hand, 



They who pov - er - ty en-dnre; But in 
That hath made the sea and land ; There-fore. 



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(20) 



Be Kind to Living Things. 






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spite of form or 
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Mary E. Carter 
Briskly. 



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Sing Always. 



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1. Sing, lit - tie bird, when the skies are bine, Sing,f or the world has need of you; 

2. Sing, happy heart, when the sun is warm, Sing in the win - ter's cold-est storm; 



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Sing when the skies are o - ver-cast, Sing when the rain is fall- ing fast. 
Sing lit - tie songs, O hearts so true ; Sing, for the world has need of you. 



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From " Children's School Songs. 



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II 



Used by arrangement with Oliver Ditson Company, owners of the copyright. 

(21) 



1 2 



Heimdall, 



August \ Larnbd, ( adapted.) 
1ST ind 2nd Sop. 
Andank . 



II. A. Clarke. 



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s * * * * s : ; * " 



i s 

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1. In Kl - der Ed- da I read it, That vol -nine of won - <ler 

2. His 'car was the best at hear - ing, Of all a-bove or be - 
:'». And he heard the feath - ersgrow - in,u r , And wool on the old sheep's 
4. I think it is on - ly guess Lng, Ileini - dall waslov-ing a> 
Alto. 



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h»ro, 
low ; 

back, 
wise, 



How Heim-dall, a god of cred - it, Was watchman at Heav-en's 

When the Springtime's step was near - ing, He heard the soft grass-es 

And e-ven the light cloud snow - ing, Far off on the sun-beam'f 

And Na-ture who bent in bless- inj;, An-oint-ed his ears and 




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ss^Ekmim ': 



door. 
grow. 

track. 



The sight of his eye was keen 
He heard the talk of the fish 
He knew what the birds are think - 

And should we but love un - doubt - 



esl <>f all those in Asgard's 

I >eep dow n in the si-lent 
ing, That brood o'er the crowded 
< per - chance, ah! who can 




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towers. For he saw when earth was green- est, Pale Autumn a -mid the flowers, 
sea; And e-ven the on-breathed wish - es of chick in its shell heard he. 

nest. Ere their fledg-ling'S eyes are blink -ing, And song is warm in the breast. 
tell, We m'uht hear the corn-b!ade Bprout-ing, And the ti - ny leaf- hud swell. 




Copyright, 1887, by s. J. Kddy 



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(22) 



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13 



Oh, Scatter Kind Words. 



German. 




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1. Oh, scat-ter kind words all a-round you; Some heart in its sor-row will stay, 

2. oh, scat-ter kind words to the lone - ly, The friend - less, weak, and de -pressed; 



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And catch-ing the bright beaming treasures, Find com - fort ma - ny a day. 
Oh, scat-ter kind words to the err - ing, In God shall your labors be blest. 



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Oh, scat - ter kind words by tbe way - side, Nor fan- cy your la - bor in vain ; 
Oh, scat- ter kind words all around you. Perchance when your mission is o'er, 



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They bless like tbe beau-ti - ful sun - light, They fall and cheer like, the rain. 
The seed yon have dropp'd in a mo- menl, May bloom on e-tcr - ni - ty's shore. 



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14 



Dare To Do Right. 



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1. Dare to do right! dare to be true! You have a work that im 

2. Dare to do right! dare to be true! Oth - er men's fail - ores can 

3. Dare t<> do right! dare to be true! God sees your faith and will 



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nev - er save you! stand by your con-science, your hon - or, your faith, 
car - ry you through ; Keep - ing His lov-ing help ev - er in Bight, 



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An - gels will has - ten the sto - ry to tell. Then dare to do right! 

stand like a he - ro and bat - tie till death. 

Can you not dare to be true and do right? 

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(24) 



Dare To Do Right. 

V [y \ /T\ fS h* PS IV 




1 5 



The Rose Is Queen Among the Flowers. 



Rev. F. L. Bosmer. C. W. Wexdte- 

Grazioso. 

1. The rose is oueena-mong the flow'rs,None oth- er is so fair; The 

2. But sweet- er than the li - ly's breath, And than the rose more fair, The 

3. The rose will fade and fall a -way, The li - ly too will die; But 

4. Then sweet-er than the li - ly's breath, And than the rose more fair, The 




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li - ly nod- ding on her stem, With fra-grance fills the air, 

ten-der love of hu - man hearts, That springeth ev - ery - where, 

love shall live for ev - er-more, Be - yond the star - ry sky, 
ten-der love of hu - man hearts, Up-spring-ing ev - ery -where, 

-•- -•- -•- •- -•- -#- -•- -•- -•- •- ^ — ^\ 

je K — n p—^d — ^ 




The 
The 
But 
The 

-*— 



-; 






li - ly nod 
ten - der love 
love shall live 
ten - der love 



ding on her stem. With fra - grance fills the air. . 
of hu - man hearts, That spring-eth ev - ery - where, 
f or - ev - er-more, Be - yond the star- ry sky. . 
of hu - man hearts, Up - spring-ing ev - ery - where. 



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From " The Carol," by permission of C. W. Wkndte. 



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II 



(25) 



Speak Kindly. 



i.rn.i.v Clark 
nit' Vivace. 



Reiki 




1. Speak kind - ly, speak kind - ly to young and to 

2. Speak kind - ly. speak kind - ly; no tongue can e\ 

3. Speak kind - ly. speak kind - ly: kind words nev - er 



old: The 
press The 
yet Brought 




Fine. 






P 



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words of true kindness are bet - ter than gold. Kind words ev-'ry morn-ing, kind 
pow'r of true kindness to cheer and to bless. It soothes ev - 'ry sor - row, makes 
ha - tied or dis-cord or grief or re-gret. Speak kind- ly.speak kind-ly, and 





B.C. 



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words ev - 'ry night, And kind words for - ev - er, in dark days or bright 
smooth ev - 'ry path: It light - ens all bur - dens, and turns a -way wrath, 

then nev - er fear; Life's lil - ies and ros - es wll bloom all the year. 



17 



God Bless the Little Children, 



Lili.ik E, Bark. 
Allegretto. 



G. H. LomaS. 



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1. God bless the 

2. God bless the 



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lit 

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tie 



chil - dren, Wher 
chil - dren, Wher 



I 
ev - er they may be! 
ev - er they may be! 



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Out on the si - lent 
Wheth-er thev kneel at 



prai - rie. Down 
eight- fall Be - 



by 
side 



the sound -hag sea,- 

a moth-er's knee, 



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a tempo. 






Flow'rs in 
Or a- sleep in 



crowded ci 
or- phan homes. 
m m -&- 



Like birds in for - est free, 
Still ten - der - ly pray we. 



God 
God 



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bless the 
bless the 



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lit - tie 



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er they may be! 
er they may be!' 

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(27) 



18 



Star of Mercy. 



C. Fannie ai.i.yv 

Andante. 

mf. 

4 : 



Geo. H. Lomas. 



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of Mer - cy, shin -ing bright, With ten - der, soft, and ho - ly light, 
thy in - ner, gen - tie life, Peace ood -quershate in vales of strife, 

to kind-ness ev - 'ry hour, 
in ev-'ry land and place, 



1. o Star 

2. Be -fore 

:>. O'er ten -der chil-dren may thy power In - spire 
4. Touch with thy sun - ny, cheer - ful grace Man - kind 



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We hail with joy the light that 

Bids cm - el - ty and sor - row 

Till, grown to deeds of mer-cy 
Till Jus-tice tri-umphs, and we 



I 

leads To bet - tcr lives and no- blerdeeds. 

die, That love may ev - er hoy -er nigh. 
here, Thy reign shall cast out ev-'ry fear. 

see The reign of true hn - man - i - ty. 



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() Mer-cy's Star, bright Mer- cy'sStar, Shine - verhome, and lands a - far: 



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|YVeTi work and hope that ev - 'rv mind Shall feel thy glo-ry there en - shrined, 

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Star of Mercy. 



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and shore Thv star shall guide ns 






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19 



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a. D. Fogg. 

With spirit 



Marching Song. 



Adapted from Barxby 



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1. We're march- ing 

2. For un - der 

3. faith - fnl. 

4. And filled with 



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on to vie - to - ry, 
its pro - tect - ing care, 
pa - tient friends, so true, 
pity - ing care and love, 
fit — ^f* « #_ 



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Our flag of love un - 
The suf-frirtg beast and 
You shall not plead in 
For the help -less and op ■ 
* « *■ 






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cres. 




furled ; 
bird, 

vain, 
pressed, 



The 
The 
For 
Our 



bright-ness of 
help - less child, 
Mer - cy Bands 
hearts are strong, 



our 
in 
are 
our 



Sil ■ 

ty - 

gath 
feet 



ver Star 
rants' hands, 
er - ins 
are swift. 



Shall 
May 

From 
Our 



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e r b 'r : 's 

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l ' 

shine o'er all the 

know their woe< are 

ev - 'ry hill and 

mis - sion shall be 



world, 
heard, 
plain, 
blessed, 



-: 



Shall shine o'er all the 

May know their woes are 

From ev - 'ry hill and 

Our mis - sion shall be 



world. 

lu-ard. 

plain, 
blessed. 



■)■-- 



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20 



Lift Aloft Our Banner. 



Rev. TH0MA8 TlMMINS. 



Tone: 



Glory! Hallelujah!" 

ft 




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Lift a -loft our ban - ner proud -ly; let its folds sa-lute the sky; We will 
To protect the weak and help-less, to act kind-ly on - to all, Whether 
With our Bands we'll join all na- tions, with peace, mer-cy, right, and love. Fill 
Round the world our Bands are inarching,guid-ed by the Lord of Might; The 



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sing 


our hymn of tri - umph ; Glo - ry be 


to God 


on high! 


Young and 


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man or dumb crea-tures, high or low, 


or great 


or small. 


Foi right, 


lives 


with joy and hap - pi - oess, and lead on 


to heav'n 


a - bove, 


Scat -ter 


kind. 


the mer - ci-ful, and good, serve Him best 


and most 


a - right ; 


Then march 




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old are glad - ly join - ing. led on by sweet Mercy's cry, Our Bands are marching 
gen - tle-ness, and jus -tiee. for each one weloud-ly call, God's Cause is marching 
free- ly seeds of kind - ness,with the sj m -bol of the dove, God's Love is marching 

on be-neath our ban - ners.and act no - bly in His sight, Our Bands are marching 



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lu - jali! CJlo - ry, glo - ry, hal - le - lu - jaht Our Bands are marching on 

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21 



BONAR. 



He Liveth Long Who Liveth Well. 

Tune: --Ward." L.M. 
Arr. by Dr. Mason. 




: mm 



ME 
I T 

1. He liv-eth long, who liv-eth well, All else is be - ing flung a - way; 

2. Be wi>e and use thy wis-dom well. Who wis-dom speaks. must live it too; 

3. Sow truth if thou the true wouldst reap, Who sows the false shall reap the vain; 

4. Sow love and taste its fruit-age pure: So \v peace and reap its liar - vest bright ; 

I -fa" 




*)■: 



He liv-eth long -est who can tell Of true things tru - ly done each day. 

He is the wis -est who can tell How first he lived, then spake. the true- 

E - rect and sound thy conscience keep ; From hollow words and deeds re - f rain. 

Sow sunbeams on the rock and moor, And find a liar -vest home of light. 

m^0 , -, f , 



I / T 



22 



1 Ring the bells of mercy, ring them loud 

and clear! 
Let their music linger on the ear; 
Fill our souls with pity for the dumb and 

weak : 
Tell the voiceless we for them will speak. 
Chorus. 

- the mercy bells both loud and clear! 
1. • e and kindness are our mottoes dear. 
Ring the bells of mercy, ring them loud 

and clear ! 
Let their music linger on the ear. 



Ring the Bells of Mercy. 

Tunc : •« Ring the Bells of Heaven." 
2 Ring the bells of mercy over hill and plain ! 



Let the mountains chant the glad refrain; 
For where man abideth. or creature God 

hath made, 
Laws of kindness on each soul are laid. 



3 Ring the bells of mercy over land and sea! 
And let millions join the jubilee: 
Peace on earth descending fill the human 

breast, 
Giving to the weary blessed rest 
(31) 



23 



To Mother Fairie. 



ai.kk Cart. 
„ Recilaiivo. 

W&E3 
► " 4 • 



Unknot n. 
( Air: Wnat's a' the Steer, Kimmer?) 



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1. Good old ninth - er Fair-ie, 

2. To chase a - way the shad-ows 



Sit - ting by your fire, 
That make her moan and weep, 



To 




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want 
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in dreams she reach- 


J 

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es 


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milk, and churn. and 
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gone. 




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Words l>y permission of Houghton, Mifflin, <fc Co. 



(32) 



To Mother Fairie. 



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wast 


- kled Bro\N 

- ed fin - 


n-ies, 
gers, 


With gris - ly 
And make the 


beards, and 
rings stay 


thin : 
on. 




But 

They 


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pa - tient lit - tie peo- pie, 
must be ver - y cun - nin< 



With hands of bus - y care, 
To make the fu - ture shine 



And 
lake 



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straw-ber-ries, A % 


Lave you such to spare ? 
row- ing on one vine; 

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C33) 



To Mother Fairie. 




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know a poor, pale bod - y, 
good old moth - er Fai - rie, 



Who can - not sleep at night, And I 
Since now my need you know, Tell m< 




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24 



Victory is Nigh, 



Mrs. P. A. F. Wood-Wiiitk. 

1 Hearts of love with hands of mercy, 

Bear our joyful song; 
Highest hills and lowest valley, 
Roll the words along. 

Cho. Join our Bands; the word is spoken, 
Mercy is our cry ; 
We will plead for voiceless creatures, 
Victory is nigh! 

2 See the countless bands of children 

Marshaled on the plain; 



Tune. "Hold the Fort. 



(34) 



Hear their happy voices ringing 

In the grand refrain. 

3 Cruel acts and dire oppression 

Soon will be no more; 
We will hear the law of kindness, 
To the farthest shore. 

4 Come to-day, the world is moving] 

Soon our eyes w ill see 
Tenderness to all God's creatures, 
Sound the jubilee! 



25 



Little Hands. 



Mrbiam del Banco. 



German. 




ri 



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tear, But to move in deeds of 

hand Should be lift - ed tip in 

-<5>- • -•- -• ■#- • 



r — = — 

kind - ness, And to fold in thoughts of 
mer-cy, Should be- long to Mer-cy's 

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prayer. Lit - 
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be gen - 


can 
tie, 


• 

be 
lit - 

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so gen - tie ! They should nev - er, nev - er 
tie fin - gers ; Weave a web like sunshine 

v • •- » • • -m- +' 5- 


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dare To be cru - el to the crea-tures God com-mit - ted to their care. 
gleams; Then your days will fill with mu - sic That will ech - o thro' your dreams. 

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(35) 



26 



Loving-Kindness To All 



Words adapted from 
•■< >ur Dumb Animals 

s ita . 



Turn 



Happy Greeting to All." 




i TO J j i nrti 1 1 : f 



i. Be kind to all creat-ures, be gen-tle, be true, For food and pro - 
2. Be kind to all creat-ures, nor grudge them your care, God gave them their 
'3. The brave are the ten-der, then do not re-fuse To care Cor most 






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tec - tion they look up to you; 
life, and your love they must share, 
kind-ly the creat-ures you use. 



For af - f ection and help to your 
And He v\ho the spar-ro\v\s fall 
Make their life's la - bor hap-py, 



9Si 



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I 

boun-ty they turn; Oh, do not their trust-ing hearts wan-ton - ly spurn! 
ten-der-ly heeds, Will lov-iug-ly look on com-pas-sion-ate deeds, 
not dreary and sad; Their working and serv-ing you, eas - y and glad. 



mm 



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Lov - ing-kind - ness 



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to 



all! 



l.ov - Ing-kind - ness to 






Loving-Kindness to All, 



- tt 



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all 



Lov- ing-kind-ness, Lov-ing-kindness, Lov-ing'-kind-ness to all! 



SS^^S 



( * 



. 



27 



U7//? wigwr. 



Work, for the Night Is Coming. 

Dr. Lowell Mason. 




^ 



1. Work. for the night is com - ing, Work thro* the morning hours; Work while the dew is 

2. Work. for the night is com- ing, Work thro* the sun-ny noon ; Fill brightest hours with 

3. Work, for the night is com- ing, Un-der the sun-set skies, Whiletiieir bright tints are 

,1 r jH J , J J ,. .: . * *• ' * 



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spark - ling, 

la - bor, 

glow - ing, 

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Work 'mid spring-ing flowers; Work when the day grows bright- er, 
Rest comes sure and soon; Give ev - 'ry fly - ing mo - ment 
Work, for day -light flies; Work till the last beam fad - eth, 









mm 



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p 

Work in the glowing sun; Work, for the night is com- ing, When man's work is done. 

Something to keep in store; Work fur the night is com - ing, When man works no more. 

Fad -eth to shine no more; Work while the night is darkening. When man's work is o'er. 

._-t_ •:!-•-.. ^. ,j _r m i , i i.tf ■•- - 



II 






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T 

Used by arrangement with Oliver DiTSOa Company, owners of tlie copyright 

(37) 






lialB 



28 



Gladly Lend a Hand, 



Miss Caroline Bazard. 



Twin 



\uld Lang Syne." 

v 



0.00- m |/ / 

i. Full many a thous-and liv - Ing leaves It takes to deck one tree, 

•_'. Full many a Glower must bios - sora fair, To deck the robe of Spring; 

;>. And ni'ith - er leaf nor fair - est flower, But does Its part with joy. 



s: 



*=* 







And each 
Full many 
Then let 



leaf tint - ters in the breeze To make it fair 
a bird must do its share To make the cho - rus ring. 
us each from this glad hour, Our no - blest powers em - ploy, 



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Then look not down, but ev - er up, Look out o'er all the land, 
Then look not down, but ev - er up, Look out O'er all the land, 
And look not down, but ev - er up, Look out o'er all the land, 






• 



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Look for - ward, for - ward, nev - er back. And glad- ly lend a hand. 



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29 



Little Gustava. 



Cii. i.v Thaxtkr, (adapted.) 

:=r=a± — *-=Xl — * 



H. A. Clarke. 



Lit - tie Gus - tav 



sits in the sun, 



Safe in the porch, and the 

1 




lit - tie drops run From the 



ci - cles un - der the eaves so fast, For the 



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bright spring sun shines warm at last, And glad is lit - tie Gus - tav - a. 



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2. She wears a quaint 



lit 






55 



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3. Up comes her lit -tie gray 



tie scar-let cap. And a small green bowl she 
eoax-ing cat, With her small pink nose,and she 






holds in her lap, Filled with bread and warm ni ilk quite up to the brim, With 
mews," What's that ?"Gus - tav - a feeds her, and she begs for some more; A 

Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Eddy. Words by permission of Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 



Little Gustava. 



■J 1 * ;/ — fc/ H- * # 



/ • 

wreath of mar-i-golds round the rim: "Ha, ha!" Laughs lit-tle Gus - tav - a. 

small brown hen walks in at the door; "Good day !'"cries lit-tle (ins - tav - a. 



*;$ 




V V V 

4. She scat - ters crumbs for the lit 

5. Dain - ty and eag - er they pick 



tie brown hen. There 
np the crumbs; But 




- s —^-* =t=3=& 



comes a rush and a flut-ter and then Down 11 y her whke doves so 

who is this thro' the door - way conies.' A lit - tie Scotch ter - ri - er, 




Ken 
lit 



tie and sweet, With their snow 
tie dog Rags, Looks in 



y 

her 



wings and 

face, and his 




-•— 



V 


¥ 




I 


crim 


- 


son 


feet: 


fun 


- ny 


tail 


wags 



"Wel-come!" cries lit 
Ha, ha!" laughs lit 



tie (ins - tav - a. 
tie (Jus - tav - a. 




you want some break - fast. 
Wait - big with - out stood 



too? 

spar - row 



and down 
and crow. 



She 



(40) 



Little Gustava. 




sets her bowl on the brick floor brown ; Then her lit - tie dog Rags drinks 

Cool -ing their feet in the melt - ing snow : "No w won't you come in too, good 




up all 
folk?" 



the 
she 



milk, 
cried : 



While she 




strokes his shag 
But they were bash 



ful, 



gy 

and 



m= 



locks, like 
stayed out 



silk: "Dear Rags," says 
side, Tho' "Pray come 



lit 
in! 



tie Gus - tav 
cried Gus - tav 



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: HE 



i 



8. She threw them the bread, and knelt on the mat With the doves and bid -dy and 

9. Kit - ty and ter - ri - er, bid - dy and doves, 



All things liv-ing,dear 



£ 



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dog and cat, And her moth - ei came to the o - pen house-door ; 
Gus-tav -a loves. The shy, kind crea-tures 'tis joy to feed, And 



-ft-fc *i 



f—f- 



"Dear lit -tie daugh-ter, I bring you more, My mer-ry lit - tie Gus -tav -a!' 
oh, her breakfast is sweet in - deed To hap - py lit - tie Gus - tav - a ! 



(41) 



30 



Over in the Meadow. 



KINDERGARTEN PLAY. 
. FOB ELEVEN CHILDEEN.) 
Mrs. Olivr a. Waiwworth. Adapted.) 
^ h u Sprightly. 



L. B. M \i:»m ILL. 



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the meadow, in the sand, 



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the Min. 



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Lived a mother toad and her lit -tie toad - y one^TFinfc/" said the mother; "I 






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wink," said the one; So she winked and she blinked, 

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Copyright, IV'7, l>y S. J. EDD1 , 



(42) 




Over in the Meadow. 



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sand, in the sun: So she winked and she blinked, in the sand, in the sun. 



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II 



Second. Seventh. 

Over in the meadow, where the stream runs Over in the meadow, by the old mossy gate, 

blue, Lived a mother lizard and her little lizards 
Lived a mother fish and her little fishes two. eight. 

"Swim!" said the mother; "We swim," said "Bask!" said the mother; "We bask," said 

the two ; the ei^ lit ; 

So they swam and they leaped where the So the}" basked in the sun on the old mossy 

gate. 



stream runs blue. 

Third. 
Over in the meadow, in a hole in the tree, 
Lived a mother-bluebird and her little birdies 

three. 
"Sing!" said the mother; "We sing," said the 

three ; 
So they sang and were glad in the hole in the 

tree. 

Fourth. 
Over in the meadow, in the reeds on the shore, 



Eighth. 
Over in the meadow, where the clear pools 

shine, 
Lived a mother frog and her little froggies 

nine. 
''Croak!" said the mother ; "We croak," said 

the nine; 
So they croaked and they splashed where the 

cool pools shine. 

XlNTII. 



Lived a mother musk-rat and her little ratties Over in the meadow, in a sly little den, 

four. Lived a mother spider and her little spiders ten. 

"Dire!" said the mother; "We dive," said "Sjjin!" said the mother; "We spin," said 
the four; the ten; 

So they dived and they burrowed in the reeds So they spun lace webs in their sly little den. 
on the shore. Tenth. 

Fifth. Over in the meadow, in the soft summer even, 

Over in the meadow, in the snug bee-hive, Lived a mother firefly and her little Hies 

Lived a mother honey-bee and her little eleven. 



honeys five. 
"Buzz!" said the mother; "We buzz," said 

the five ; 
So they buzzed and they hummed in the snug 

bee-hive. 

Sixth. 
Over in the meadow, in a nest built of sticks, 
Lived a mother crow and her little crows six. 
"Caw!" said the mother; "We caw," said 

the six ; 



"Shine!" said the mother; "We shine," said 

the eleven ; 
So they shone and they shone in the soft 

summer even. 

Eleventh. 
Over in the meadow, where the men dig and 

delve, 
Lived a mother ant and her little anties twelve. 
"Toil!" said the mother; "We toil," said the 

twelve; 



So they cawed and they called in the nest So they toiled and were wise where the men 
built of sticks. dig and delve. 

(43) 



Over in the Meadow. 



*fc 



All. Waltz mou ■ 



m s ^m ;: ^ i -:_M 



o - ver in the meadow, . . where the boys play and run, . . . There 



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walked a wise . . fa - ther with his own . . lit - tie son. . . 



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glad!" said the fa- ther; . . "I'm glad," said the son. . . 



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Over in the Meadow. 



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see 





1= 

joy - ful life 



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in each lit - tie one, . . . For I 

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live on 



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(45) 



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Over in the Meadow. 

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■tud-y or play. "So they all danced and sang, and they worked 



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0- ver in the meadow, that sun-shin-y day. 

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31 



The Chipmunk, 




\ \ , i \ 

u With animation 
• £ <s 



1. 1 know an old oou - pie that lived in a wood, 
j. Their par- lor was lined with tbe soft- est of wool, 
3. Now win- ter came on with its frost and its snow, 




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Wm. L. Glover. 



Chip-pe - ree, chip - pe-ree, 

Chip-pe- ree.cliip- pe-ree, 

Chip-pe- ree,chip- pe-ree, 
\ \ \ 



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chip! . And np in a tree-top their dwelling it stood, Chip-pe-ree,ehip-pe-ree, 
chip ! . Their kitchen was warm and their pantry was full.Chip-pe-ree.chip-pe-ree, 
chip ! . Thev cared not a bit when they heard the wind blow,Chip-pe-ree,chip-pe-ree, 

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The summer it came, and the summer it Tvent, Chip-pe-ree,chip 

And four lit-tle ha - bies peeped out at the sky, Chip-pe-ree,chip 

. For wrapp'd in their furs, thev all lav down to sleep, Chip-pe-ree. chip 



-• — *•- 

pe-ree, 
pe - ree, 
pe - ree, 





-•— •- 



**-: 



muri] 



chip! And there they lived on and they never paidrent,Chipperee,chipperee. chip! 
chip ! You nev-er saw darlings so pretty and shy, Chip-pe-ree,chip-pe-ree, chip ! 
chip! But oh. in the spring how their bright eyes will Deep,Chipperee,chipperee,chip 1 



32 



My Cat and Dog. 



M kORI. 

Allegro, mf 

T— ■ | -T-l PN 



Geo. II. Lom L8. 



: : • i JJI; ^i l ; 



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s 



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* 1/ I 

1. I have a eat, Bhe's as black as my hat, Fur lif - ty times fin - er than 

2. Eisdear lion est nose lie snoves in - to my hand, Yet growls if a rogue comes in 



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silk, And what-e'ei is oc - cur - ring, she al - ways 

view; And his great wag-ging tail makes one quite mi 

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purr-mg, 
der-stand 




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Es-pe - cial- ly o - 
He's a watchman both fear 


ver her milk. 
• less and true. 


And I have 
A . . trio 

IS IS - 


1 1 
a dog, too, a 
of jol - ly co 

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won-der-ful dog, No - bil - i - ty beams in his 
panionsare we, To- geth -er we pleas-ant-ly 

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eye 
jog; 



And ear - ly or late for his 
In - dulgein no riot, but 



mm 

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i "in •• iiir Humane Educ itor," I 






My Cat and Dog. 

. accel. 



mas - 
live 



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ter 
ver 



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he'll wait, None such friends as dear dog - gie and I. 
- y quiet, My - self and my cat and my dog. 






II 



II 



33 Cheerfully. 

r'nfl wf *, is 


A Little Mouse 










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1. There was 

2. At the c 

3. So he 

4. Farm-er C 


once a lit - tie n 
oor-way of his 1 
nib - bled and he 
Jole, good wor - thy 


m S m 

louse that had made 
onse, on a car - 
ate, then he roll'd 
man, saw him day 

J J *_ 


b 

a 

pet 

on 

af 

-•- 


9 # 9 4 

snug hole In a 
of green, There this 
the ground ; He was 
- ter day ; But he 




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corn-field be - long-ing to good Farmer Cole, In which ev-'ry-thinggrew that was 
field-mouse oft sat and beheld the fair scene." This is tru - ly a ver - y fine 
blithe as a lark, and his sleep too was sound. As he lay in his hole, far from 
nev - er at-tempt-ed to harm or to slay:" For," said he, "since we've plenty, and 




plea-sant to eat, From beans, oats, and bar - ley, to red 

cornfield," said he; "And doubt-less 'twas plant-ed on pur 

dan - ger and noise, Not hunt - ed by dogs, nor an-noy'd 

God gave it all, We'll spare a few grains for a crea 



and white wheat. 
pose for me." 
by bad boys, 
ture so small.' 



•) 



7> 



&£ 



m 



From the English " Band of Mercy.' 



(49) 



34 



The Honest Old Toad 



Geo. TT. Lom is. 




1. Oh, 

2. When 



queer lit - tie chap 
win - ter draws near, 



is the 
Mis - ter 



hon 
Toad 



est 
soes 



to bed, 




6 




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A fun - ny old fel - low is he; 
And sleeps just as sound as a top; 




tr— r-^s— +- 

Liv-ing an - der the stone by the 
But when May blossoms fol - low sofl 

I 1 F P 1- 

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side 
A 

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the road, 'Neath the shade of the old wil - low tree. 



pril show-ers, 



lie comes out with a skip, jump and hop. 



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He 

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dressed all in brown from his toe to his crown, Save his vest that is sil - v'ry white. 
chang-es his dress on - ly once, I con -f ess, Ev*ry spring: and his old worn-out coat, 



9i_?» * 



te^— b-L- 







- 



Copyright, 1897, by 8. J. Eddt. 



(50) 



The Honest Old Toad. 



cres. 






3=i 



fs ps- — i — I — , s r i — fn — m ^j- I 



He takes a long nap in the heat of the day, And walks in the cool, dew - y night. 
With trousers and waistcoat,he rolls in a ball, And stuffs the whole thing down his throat. 



^ 



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m 



:=: 



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P P | 



"Raup, yaup," says the frog, From his home in the bog; But the 
"K-rruk.k-rruk, v says the frog, From his home in the bog; But the 






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he says nev 



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tries to be good, like the 



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dren who should 



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(51) 



35 The Arab's Farewell to His Favorite Steed. 



The Hon. Mrs. Norton. 

In moderati Una, with impassioned feeling 

• • •* • rf* 



John Blockley. 



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. dolce. 
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My beau - ti.-ful! my beau - ti-ful! that stand -est meek - ly by, With thy 

'. ^M h • • • • j-*-j ! J I 1 1 J - 



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0- ~pg -.4 zq 



r»ed by arrangement with Jon Blooklsy, Publisher, England. 

(62) 



The Arab's Farewell to His Favorite Steed, 



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des - ert now With all thy wing-ed speed, 



I may not mount on 



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(53) 



The Arab's Farewell to His Favorite Steed, 



N 9 



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thee a gain, rhou'rt sold, my A - rab steed. 



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pa - tient hoof, Snuff not the breez-y wind, 



The farther that thou 



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(54) 



The Arab's Farewell to His Favorite Steed. 



. 



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bri - die rein; Thy mas-ter hath his gold. 



V-> S • a a— 



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Fleet limb'd and beauti - ful, 

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fare thee well IThou'rt sold ray steed,thou'rt sold. 



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raoZfo espressivo, epiu lento. 



m 



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The morn - ing sun shall dawn a Rain, 



But 



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(55) 



The Arab's Farewell to His Favorite Steed, 



dim. 



-N— t 



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—v — v- 

Shall I gal-lop 



nev-er more with thee 

— — 



thro' 



the 



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des-ert 



paths, 



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Where we were wont to be. 

E 



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Eve-ning shall darken on the earth, And o'er the sand-y plain Some 

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(56) 



The Arab's Farewell To His Favorite Steed, 
rail. dim. 



•— •— 



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I 



Oth- er steed, with slow- er steps, Shall bear mo home a- gain. 






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When the dim distance cheats mineeve, And thro' the gath'ring tears. 



Thv 



:ib 



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• * *- * -•-* r * * T tF #/!*/* ^ * 9 -9- -9 9 



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bright form for a moment like The false mi- rage ap -pears. And 



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r 

57) 



The Arab's Farewell to His Favorite Steed. 



moUo espn >. < con dolore. 



J=J: 



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X • 



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jit - ting down by thai green well, 1*11 pause and Bad - ly think. 



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! 

here 

ott J 


he bow'd 


his glos-sy neck. 
1 ° 


When last 

! 


I saw him drink. 




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Agitato c accelerando. 



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When last 1 saw thee drink, a-way! Thefever'd dream i- 

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The Arab's Farewell To His Favorite Steed 



v 



dim. 



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could not Live a day and know That we should meet uo moiv, 



Thev 



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tempt-ed me, my bean - ti - full For hun-ger's pow'r is strong— They 



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eves. 



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tempt-ed me, my beau - ti - ful! But I havelov'd too Ion; 



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159) 



The Arab's Farewell to His Favorite Steed. 
r\ oJuto appassionato. 



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Wlm said that I 



bad eiv'n thee up? 



Who said that thou wast 






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Bold! 



'T is false, 't is false, my A - rab 



steed ! I 



fp =:= : s s s : : s s s =; 

t/ *L^ t/ C^ -#- -#^ -•- -•- # -•- -N/ - __ 

sift ■ y zgz: • =^= RF 111 — •— 



animate. 



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fling them hack their gold! 
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(60) 



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The Arab's Farewell to His Favorite Steed. 



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on thy back. and scour the dis - tant plains 



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■who o - ver - takes 



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(61) 



36 



Three Kittens. 



i 



.\ NUN. 

Allegretto, mf 



Geo. ii. i.om \<. 



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4 - 



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1. In ;m old brick ov - en not far from here, All 

2. Hound and round they run, in the fun - ni - esl style, Al'-ter 

F 



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a p^ . 



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cud - died up in a 

each lit - tlf one's grey 



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heap, 

tail: 

I 

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Arc three lit - tie kit -tens so 

Hut the tail whirls the fast - er, and 



=* 



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cres. 



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cun-ning-ly dear; Their sto - ry, I know, you would like to hear, 

once in a while They fly round so swift - lv that all in a pile 



i > * nnn3 



m 



dim. 



While 

Tliev 



they are fa>t a 

hud - die like leaves in a 

i 



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sleep. 
gale. 

-f 



mf 

s 



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— •— — • — 



Tw 

Then 



(«2) 



I—' — * 

1 \ — tr— ' 



Three Kittens. 



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spot - ted 
old 


with white, 
Moth - er Gray, 


one 
with 

! 


is 
a 


so - 
face 


1 
ber - 

quite 

-•- 


ly 
de - 


grey, 
mure, 

-•- 


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Save the 
Sits 

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paws so soft and white Which with ash - es 

wink-ing at their droll play; And once 

.fesz.. # Jbm 



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and coals so 

in a while she 



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I 

fre - quent - ly 
says, with a 

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play, 
purr: 

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And 
"My 



in - to 
dear 



SEE 



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all mis - chief so 
lit - tie kit - tens, you must 
-•- * m 

1=3=*== 



dim. 




37 



The Mountain Goatherd 



K. Caldwell 




.1 S Stkane. 



Soft 
He 

A.8 
Their 



• ly the Bhad - owe glide \ - 
blows Dp - 0D his horn— A 

he winds a - long His 
foot - Btep soon he hears, And 



cross the wood 
hun - dred ech 
voice breaks in 
one bv one 



Wm 



land 
oes 
to 
ap 



SB 



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side ; 
born 
song : 
pears, 



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Soft - ly the dews np - on the moan - tain fall; 

Of his sweet inn - sic rise and an - swer him; 

'Come home, Je - nette, come home, my Lies- chen white; 

Crack-ling the with - ered boughs be-neath their feet; 

<? -<$>- h. . mm. m S 



Sweet sing -ing 
With - in the 
Wide o - pen 
They gath - er 

s 




the tree 



of a bird A - mid the trees is heard, 

belt of pine Tin- lingering ech - oes twine, 

stands the gate, "For you the milk-pails wait; 

at his side, And homeward does he guide 



-&- -•- - - -g>- 

And shrill a - bove it 
Till lost a - mid the 
Come home be -fore the 
His {rood - ly charge, so 




sonnds the herds-man's 

• lis - tance dark and 

fall - ing of the 
play - ful. lithe, and 




call, 
dim. 
night. 

fleet. 



Soft 



l.v 



r 

From English - Band "t Mercy Melodies,' 



tm^m 



i 

the shad - ow^ glide A - 



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E 



The Mountain Goatherd. 

mf rail. \ 



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¥ 



cross the woodland side ; Soft - ly the dews up 



azzc: 



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on 

-0- 



the moun-tain fall. 



38 



Mary Howitt. 
Brilliant. 
mf \ 



Summer Woods. 



L. B. Marshall. 



cres. 




Come ye in - to the summer woods :There entereth no an - uoy ; All greenly wave the 

I can-not tell you half the sights Of beauty you may see, The bursts of gol-den 

And far within that summer wood. Among the leaves so green, There flows a lit - tie 

There come the lit-tle gen- tie birds, With-ont afear of ill; Down to the murm'ring 

And clash about and splash about, The merry lit - tie things ; And look askance with 




cres.mollo e rail. 



¥ El} t t^f^HtWJ UW11 J. f I J: H 



chestnut leaves. And the earth is full of 

sun - shine. And ma - ny a shad-y 

gurgling brook. The bright-est e'er was 

wa-ter's edge And free - ly drink their 

bright black eyes. And rlirt theirdrooping 



^? 



■L^ 



#■ -*- 




And the earth is full of joy. 
And ma -ny a shad-y tree. 
The bright - est e'er was seen. 
And free- ly drink their till! 
And flirt their drooping wings. 



|||g 



re m it l it-i M 



(So) 



39 



The Woodmouse. 



Mary IIowitt. 



a. Dawson. 



b 



u, — _„ — ,<— 4, — v — ' 4* "—4- 



T 

i. Do you know the lit- tie wood - mouse, That pret-ty lit -tie thing, 

'1. It makes a bed of the soft dry moss. In a hole that's deep and strong , 



-2 



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That sits a- mong the for -est leaves, Or by the for - est spring? 
And there it sleeps se - cure and warm, The drear - y win- ter long; 



i 



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Its fur is red like the red chest-nut. And il is small and slim. 
And thongh it keeps no cal - en - dar, it knows when flow'rs are springing, 



i 



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.-- 






It leads a life most in - no- cent, With -in the for -est dim. 

And it wak-eth to its sum-mer life, When the night-in- gale is sing-ing. 



t=t=z 






J J J j 'O 



il 



Kneii.sh " Band <>f Mercy Melodies,' 



(661 



40 



The Water-Drinkers. 



i 



J. Saffkky. 
Allegretto caniabxle. 



> 



,-tj 







1. 



A-round the sparkling foun-tain clear, The pret - ty birds are fly 
2. The pa - feient hors-es trav - el on, The wel -come trough es-py 
?. Where wa - ter flows a charm's con-f est, The spring to rill re - ply 

m — # j J~t ■ * * 4 #— , • •— m-*-t—. * 



ing, 
ing; 






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The 
With 

It 
IS 



a 



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wa - 
Joy 

slakes 



ter bright 
the cam 
the thirst 



them 
sniffs 
man 



/ T 

is dear, 
the brook, 
the best, 

SI 



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I / ^_ I 

Their thirst -y wants sup - ply - ing. 

Al - though 't is faint or dy - ing. 

A bev- 'rage pure sup - ply - ing. 




The fleec - y flocks that stud the fields, The cat 
The ti - ger, tired, for wa - ter pants, In sul 
And they who drink from na - hire's fount, Feel life 



tie 
try 



In- 
jun 



them low 
- gle ly - 



ing, 
ing; 



is worth en -joy -ing: 



All 

And 
In 




mm ii 



drink 
bus 
wa 



from streams that 
y bee. and 



na 
toil 
voi 

•- 

From English " Band of Mercy Melodies.' 




ture yields, 
Ing ants, 
ces mount, 



As 

For 



they 
wa 



are home- ward 
ter will be 



go 
pry 



Its sweet -ness ne'er is cloy 



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ing. 
Ing. 

ing. 

• 





(67) 



r — r 



41 



The Grey Kitten. 



Jane < ' lmpbsll 

ml' 



KONRADIN KrEITTZI R. 



mp 



sin : 



a-T 



jtZZMt 



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\ home -less lit- tie kit - ten Came to the door one day, "I'm 
•_'. I gave it milk to di ink. and smoothed Its pret - ty, soft grey fur, "Poor 



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cold and starved, oh, let me in!" Its sad cries seemed to say. I 

pus - By, stay with me," I said, It an-swered with a purr. And 



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took it up and shut the door Up - on the bit - ter storm, And 
ev - er since that win -ter day I have so hap - py been; I 



BE5 



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z-rr 



The Grey Kitten. 




ii 



# 



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put the lit - tie shiv-'ring thing Be - fore the fire to warm. 
gained a nier - ry play-mate when I let my pus - sy in. 




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42 



Anon. 
„ Tempo di gavotte. 



^ -i r r r 



Cunning Bee. 



■fl-N 



EM 



W.m. L. Glover. 



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r 



i -i , 

a bee with hon-ey la -den, 



1. Said a lit - tie wand'ring maid - en To 

2. "That I know, my lit - tie maid -en," Said the bee with hon-ey la -den; 

3. "Cun-ningbee with hon - ey la - den, That is right," re - plied the maid-en; 



*ta 






V— 



V- 




"Bee, at 
But the 



flow'rs you work, 
I for - sake, 



Yet in some does 
And the hon - ev 



poi - son lurk." 
on - ly take." 



So will I, from all I meet, On - ly draw the good and sweet. 



gg-fr-fr-J 



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(69) 



4c 



The Song of the Bee. 



A.NON. 



i 



y'i 









Buzz, 



This is the song of the bee: 



■a :: 



Rev, Alfred Taylor. 




His legs are of yd -low; a 




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a great work 


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£EE± 



1. In days that are sun - ny lie's get - ting his lion - ey; In 

2. The sweet-smell - Lng clov - er He, hnm-raing, hangs o - ver; The 

3. From morn - ing's first grey light, Till fad - ing of day -light, He's 

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days that are cloud - y No cour- age he lacks: Onpinksand on li - lies. And 

scent of the ro - ses Makes fra- grant his wings; He nev - er gets la - zy, From 

sing-ing and toil - ing The Bum-mer day through: Ohl we may get wea -ry. Ami 

■f- , -f- t - 



£=* ' 



?=s=£=^ 




English " Bandol Mercy Melodies.' 



The Song of the Bee. 



^ 



D. C. Chob 3. 



At4-U^ 



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9 



iray daf - fo - dil - lies, And col - um-bine blossoms, He le - vies a tax ! 

this -tie or dai - sy. And weeds of the mea-dow, Some trea-sure he brings, 
think work is drear- y; Tis hard - er, by far, To have no-thing to do! 



S=*=* 



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f f e r n =H 



44 



Jane Taylor. 




To a Butterfly. 



Leonard B. Marshall. 



-I v — — i^ 1- — i — I r ~ — *i— — N-i — i __ I ■ 

4 J ^- JZZjJ H k- h ^ :t==E==i=j=:a=t ;^fl 



1. Poor harm- less in - 

2. Why should my ty - 

3. To bask up - on 

4. Then flat - ter still 



sect, thith - er fly, And life's short hour en- joy; 

raut will sus-pend A life by wis - cloin giv'n, 

the sun - ny bed, The dam - ask flow'-rs to kiss, 

thy silk - en wings, In rich em - broid-'ry drest, 



9 i>» i ir— -e ^ 



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'T is all thou hast, and why should I That lit -tie all de - stroy? 

Or soon - er bid thy be - ing end Than was de - signed by heav - en? 

To range a - long the bend -ing shade Is all thy life of bliss; 

And sport up - on the gale that flings Sweet o - dors from his vest. 

P"*i ■«■— 



t=t 



EEt 



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r ' r -•- 

'Tis all tliou hast, and why should I That lit - tie all de - stroy? 

Or soon - er bid thy be- ing end Than was de-signed by heav- en? 

To range a - long the bend - ing shade Is all thy life of bliss. 

And sport up - on the gale that flings Sweet o - dors from his vest. 



*P i\P i Pf& l 



Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Eddy. 



(71) 



45 



The Cricket. 



From tin' Latin of Vixckxt BOURNB by COWPER. 



Qto. H. LOMAfl. 



t» 



Con moto. 



£ 



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Lit - tie in - mate full 
Thus thy praise shall be 

I 
*L JL JL 4. 



r V V 

of mirth, Chirp - tag on my k itch- en hearth, 

expressed In - of - fen - sive,wel-come£ 



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I 
Wheresoe'er be thine a-bode, Al - ways bar - bin-ger of good. Pay me for thy 

Frisk-ingthus be-fore the tire Thou hast all thy heart's desire. Tho' in voice and 
JL JL J. fl m $L £! A # N ^ / N N JL *.-<•- • 

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warm re-treat With a song more soft and sweet; In re-turn thou shalt 
shape they be Formed as if a - kin to thee, Thou sur-pass-est hap - 



re-ceive 
pier far, 



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CODA. 
Pi'm mosso. 

i 




Such a strain as I can give, j 

Happiest grass-hoppers that are. j 



J^ 



Theirs is but a sum-mer song, Thine endures the 

I 



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r=* 



(72) 



The Cricket 






• - -•- 

win -ter long, Un-impaired, and shrill and clear, Jlel - o - dy throughout the year. 

| H. Is 






46 



Arranged by M. 
Cheerfully. 



The Bee. 



IOXE. 



t 



^m 



:fc 



1. I'm a 

2. I'm a 



lit - tie 
lit - tie 



bn - sy bee Roaming in the clo - ver, Here I go, 
bu - sy bee In the mead-ows roam - ing, All the day, 



3. When the morn-ing dries the dew From the bloom-ing clo - ver, Off I wing, 



s^ 





H=f j w t \ uTvi i* 1 



There I go, All the mead-ows o - ver. Don't yon hear me sing -ing so, 
Bright and gay, Where the llow'rs are bloom-ing. Don't yon hear me sing -ing so, 
Sweets to bring, Till the day is o - ver. Don't yon hear me sing- ing so, 



3=t 



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z— z— z— z— Sing -ing, sing- ing, sing - ing so, 



4-jp p 



(III 
z — z — z — z — 



II 



From "Children's School Songs." Used by arrangement with Olivek Ditson Company, owners of the copyright. 

(73; 



47 



The Lady-Bird, 



< ii urlotte Turner Smi hi. 



a i ice Pitm \n Wi -i i v. 




=&=£ 



£= 



m 



* 

i. La - dy-bird! La - dy-bird! 

2. La - dy-bird! La - dy- bird! 

3. La - dy-bird! La - dy-bird! 



v 



v 






fly a - way home, The field-mouse has gone to hex 
fly a - way home, The glow-worm is light-ing hei 

fly a - \va\ home, The fai - ry bells tin - kle a - 




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nest ; 
lamp ; 
far ; . 



The dais - ies have shut up their sleep - y red eyes, And the 

Tlie dew's fall- ins fast, and your line speck-led wings Will be 

Make haste, or they'll catch you and liar - ness you fast With a 




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bees and the birds are at rest, 
wet with the close cling - ing damp, 
cob - web to O - be-ron's car. 



And the bees and the birds are at rest. 
Will be wet with the close,cling-ing damp. 

With a cob-web to () - be-ron's car. 




i 



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Copyright. 1897, by 8. J. Eddt. 



(74) 



48 



Chanticleer. 



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1. I wake: I feel the 
i'. The white snow gathers, 

3. I think the world is 

4. No - thing 1 see has 

a hap - "- py lit - tie 


day is near 
flake on flake; 
all a - sleep 
shape or form 
child, I lie 

r-. Iff 


I 

I 

I 

, I 

And 

N 
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/ 

hear 
hear 
hear 
hear 
hear 




/ 

the 

the 
the 

the 

the 


red cock crow- 
red cock crow 
red cock crow 
red cock crow 
red cock crow 

4 - • 


- ing! He 

- ing: Is 

- Ing! Ont 

- ing: r.nt 

- ing. The 

fs 

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cries '"T is dawn!" How sweet and clear His cheer-ful call comes to my ear. He 

a - nv - bod - y else a - wake To see the win - ter morn - ing break. Is 

of the fros- ty pane I peep; The drifts are piled so wide and deep. Out 

that dear voice comes thro' the storm To greet me in my nest so warm. But 

dav is dark, I won- der why His voice rings out so brave and high, The 




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cries 
a - 
of 
that 
day 


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"Tis dawn:" How sweet 

ny - bod - y else 

the fros - ty pane 

dear voice comes thro' 

is dark, I won - 

- -*- -•- r 


/ 

and 
a - 
I 

the 
der 

s 


clear His cheer-ful call comes to my 
wake To see the win - ter morn-ing 
peep; The drifts are piled so wide and 
storm To greet me in my nest so 
why His voice rings out so brave and 

^ ~- m m -P- m N 


o * 

ear. While 
break, While 
deep, And 
warm, As 
high, With 




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is 

thick and 
wild the 
if the 

glad - nesa 



slow 
fast 

wind 
sky 
o 



'tis 

is 

were 

ver - 



grow 


Ing, 


While 


light 


BDOW 


- ing? 


While 


thick 


blow 


Ing! 


And 


wild 


glow 


- ingl 


As 


if 


flow 


ing! 


With 


glad 



is 

and 

the 

the 

ness 



slow - ly 
fast 'tis 
wind is 
sky were 
o - ver 



grow - ing. 
snow - Ing? 
blow - ing! 
gl( w - ing! 
flow - ing! 



$t 



'-: 



m 






-#- _ v 



ii 



Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Eddt. Words by permissiot) of HODOHTO*, Mifflin & Co. 

(75) 



49 



The Bluebird, 



Emily Huntington Mn.i i h 
Cha r fully. 

Jte 



l.i oh \i;i> B. Marshall 



1. I know the song that the blue - bird is sing - ing, 

2. Hark! how the mu - sic haps out from his throat! 

3. 'Dear lit -tie bios - Boms, down on - der the snow, 

4. "Lit tlewhitesnow - drop! I pray you, a - rise; 






Sifcfl 



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fcc 




Out in the ap 
Hark ! was there ev 

You must be "svea 
Bright yel-low cro 



pie -tree where he is swinging; 
er so mer - ry a note? 
ry of win - ter, I know; 

cos! come o - pen your eyes; 



Brave lit - tie 

Lis - ten a - 
Hark, while I 
Sweet lit - tie 



ftSjjfj 'J I -4fJ-j 






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230 




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it: 



fel-low! the skies may be drea-ry, 

while ( and you'll hear what he's say -ing 

Bing you a mes-sage of cheer! 

vio - o - lets, hid from the cold. 



Noth - ing cares he while his 

Up in the ap - pie -tree, 

Sum -mer is com - ing! and 

Put on your man - ties of 







Sj^E 



r -9- 



'1 



m 



1 



Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Eddy. 



(76) 



The Bluebird. 



fefe 



> 



heart is so cheer -y, 
swing-fog and swaying, 
Springtime is here ! 
pur -pie and gold, 



gL Q s P F* fc-^f ^^ ^^F 1 ^ 111 ^ 11 ! 

-W-^-#-£-i- -\ N— •— \-F \ — 



Nothing cares he while his heart is so cheer -y. 
Up in the ap - ple-tree,swinging and sway-ing 
Sum-mer is com - ing! and Springtime is here! 
Put on your man - ties of pur - pie and gold. 



ytq [Jpl 



-+-&-& + • • tt w S * 9 -+ 9 -w- -l-*~t 



aife 



*§ 



After the last verse. 



Daf 



fo-dils! daf 



fo-dils! say, 



do you hear ? 



.jS-8- 






g 1 d > 3 



-* J. * 



PS 






?e 




50 



Chick-a-de-dee. 



Words from 
Infants' Magazine," January 

AUegretto con spirito. 



1-71. 



•• Children's Songs' Series." 
Music by Jamxs h. I Jbox \i l. 




S 






:. 



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•! 



W 



The ground was all covered with snow one day, And two lit -tic sis -ters Were 

lie had Dot been sing-ing that tune very loDg, Ere Em -i- ly heard him, so 

oh. moth- or. do gel him some stockings and shoes, And a nice little frock, and a 

There's One, my dear child, though I cannot tell who, Bas clothed meal -read-y and 



s 



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bu - sy at play, When a 
loud was his song. " Oh, 

hat if he choose ; I 
warm enough too. Good 



frrHf ;■ J' t I fjl 



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IE* 



snowbird was sit-tiug close by on a tree, And 
sis - ter, look out of the window, said she;- There' 
wish he'd come in - to our par -lor and see How 
morn-ing! Oh, who are so hap-py as we?" And 




mer - ri - ly sing - ing 

a dear little bird Bing 

warm we would make him, 

away he went sing - inn 



his 
- iuiX 
poor 

his 



Chick - a - de - dee.' 
•Chick - a - de - dee.' 
•chick - a - de - dee,' 
'Chick - a - de - dee,' 



de - dec, 

Chick - a - de - dee, 

Chick - a - de - dec. 

Chick - a - de - dee, 




■)■: 



Chick - a - de - dee; 
Chick - a - de - dec: 
Chick - a - de - dec ;' 
Chick - a - de - dee 

1 



I 



■ Mer - ri - ly sing - ing his • -Chick - a - de - dee. 
There's a dear little bird singing --chick - a - de - dee. 
How warm we would make him, poor "Cbicka-de - dec, 
And away he went sing-ing his "Chick-a-de-dee. 



=t= 



Eogllali •• Band of Mercy MHodies." 



(78j 



51 



J. Langhobne. 
Con spiriio. 
mf 



To a Redbreast. 



; 



G. H. Lomas. 






? 



Lit - tie bird, 
Well re - paid 

A. jL J 






with bos -om red, Wei -come to 
if I but spy Pleas -ure in 

4- 1 I- 



r-*7 

" i 

my hum-ble shed, 
thyglanc-ing eye; 



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EB3 









Dai - ly near my ta - ble steal, While I pick my scan - ty meal- 
See thee, when thou' st ate thy fill, Plume thy breast and wipe thy bill. 

I IN J IN I <"V* 

A. A A. d N -»- r -0- 



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r- 

Doubt not, lit - tie tho' there be, But 
Come, my feath - eredfriend,a- gain ! Well 

fN N w i N IN 

v + -«r I i 



m^mmm 



I'll cast a crumb to thee; 

thou know'st the brok-en pane; 






-V-J^ -m- 

in J. -?■*- t •£ 






meno mosso. 



IS 



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a tempo. 
* !N 



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II 



Ask of me thy dai - ly store, 



Ev 



IN 
A. A- 



m 



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er wel 
in 



come to my door. 



jl AT^ ^ 









(79) 



52 



Dicky-Birds. 



Anon. 



- £3=3 



j ,.f 



1. LOtS 

2. Sor 

3. Bon 

4. Hap 



of 

ry 

gry 

py 

-• 



^r L : ,# — * 



T. B. Perkins. 

— rv- 



" 1/ 

lit - tie dick - y - birds, Sit - ting 

lit - tie dick - y - birds, Don't you 

lit - tie dick - y - birds, Would you 

lit - tie dick - y - birds, Have you 



-*=P 



-0-r 



m a row ; 

know the way? 
like some bread? 
had e - nough? 



fc£ 



:2=£ 



£ 



1 




Lots of pairs of 

Can't you find the 

I will give you 

Don't for - get to 



*8 J 



na - 
road 

all 
come 



ked feet Bu - ried in the snow, 

to go Where it's al - ways May? 

you want, Or some seeds in - stead, 

a - gain While the weath - er's rough. 




I should think you'd fly a-way 
Rob-ins all have found it out, 



Win Te the 
Wrens and 



weath-er's warm 
thrnsh-es too: 



Then you would not 
Don't von wish vou'd 



A - ny-thinir you like to eat, You shall have it free, Ev - 'ry morn-ing. 
Bye-bye, cheerful lit - tie birds ! Off the wee things swarm, Dancing thro' the 



V V V V 



i — r— r 






' g I I 



U 



Chorus. 

n 



1111111111 Ej pp 



have to be <>ut there in the storm. 

though 1 to ask, Ere a- way they flew? 

ev - ry night, If you'll come to me. 

driv- ing snow, Sing - ing in the storm! 



Dick-y-birds, dick - y- birds, 



& tf ( i f i t-E-P u_£U-i r r r i J j 



EnglUh - Band of Mercy Melodies.' 



(80) 



Dicky-Birds. 



* 3 H 3 iH: I J 3 3 113 ^j 



:d — E>— E- 



*=S=* 



*--*^ 



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i 



Pret-ty dick - y - Dirds, Don't you want some crumbs to eat, Pret-ty dick-y-birds? 






53 



Celi.v Thaxter. 
Allegro, mf 



The Nightingale. 



From Reichardt. 



*& 



PlE^ 



^ 



s 



l 



1. There is a bird, a plain brown bird, That dwells in lands a • 

2. When, dew - y - fresh and still, the night Steals to the wait - ing 



ii&BSE 



** 



I 



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r 



•*— •« 



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far, "Whose wild de - li - cious song is heard With even-ing's first white star, 
world, And the new moon glitters sil - ver bright, And the fluttering winds are furled ; 



m&Fi. 



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II 



3 When the balm of summer is in the air, 

And the deep rose breathes of musk, 
And there comes a waft of blossoms fair 
Through the enchanted dusk ; 

4 Then breaks the silence a heavenly strain, 

And thrills the quiet night 
With a rich and wonderful refrain, 
A rapture of delight. 

5 All listeners that rare music hail, 

All whisper softly : " Hark ! 

It is the matchless nightingale 

Sweet singing in the dark." 



6 He has no pride of feathers fine ; 

Unconscious, too, is he, 
That welcomed as a thing divine 
Is his clear minstrelsy. 

7 But from the fullness of his heart 

His happy carol pours ; 
Beyond all praise, above all art, 
His song to heaven soars. 

8 And through the whole wide world his fame 

Is sounded far and near ; 
Men love to speak his very name, 
That brown bird is so dear. 



Words by permission of Houghton, Mifflin & Co. (81) 



54 



Cradle Tree-top. 



w.m. J, Long. 

Andante IranquiUo. 

u -t \ \ N 

i\ m 



IIattii: M. Vosn. 




i - :-^2 



i • • • r • f • 

1. Down in the tree- tops, rock -ing slow, the birds for the night are 

2. Rob - in ;ui(i blackbird, sparrow and thrush, and bluebird and chiek-a 






s u. s 



E=±t 



53 



come, With 
dee, 



rs rs 



S 




•)• 



sun - set lights a -glow in the west, and chil - dren gath-er -in; 
Each to his place in era -die tree-top they throng with a song of 

is is I s 
— J — # 



home. They 
glee; With 






i 



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=u 



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-pst 



crcs. 



dim. 




come from green woods, from fields and farms, where day has been played a-wa y ; 
many a laugh and scamper a-way, as shad - ows clos - er creep, 

A tujru 



To the 

Then a 






v-=»- 



wind-rocked era -die that na - tore gives for tir - ed wings to stay. :;. 
good-night hymn to the dear,bright world, and twitter of go-ing to sleep. 

*_. ,—± 



The 



>» 



*=*- 



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, 



(82) 



EEFITEf 



■P^t 



Cradle Tree-top. 






S-3=* 



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A >'i 



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era - die rocks, the south wind croons a 



r 

pine-tree lul 



9M^fa: g | f M w 



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b 3 



And 



2*± 






A— 



Btf 



: # — •- 









un - der eacli wing it 



pil - low soft, where drow- sy heads may lie. 



Then 






*-•- 



.j q_n- 



• I ft 












a tempo. 



•—* 



4= 



i r i u r 

Moth - er Xa-ture looks soft - ly in, and tucks the leaves in tight, 



** 



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T 



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And 

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sets the stars to watch o - ver -head till com-ing of morn - ing light. 

N J m 
A 4 C IF 

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S 



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i 



(83) 



55 



The Wounded Curlew. 



Ciii \ Til w 1 BR. 
Plainlivt ly. 



L. B. Marshall. 



* 



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^ 5=| 



£= 



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E3 






1. I'.v von -der 8and 

2. And round the bas 

3. But some-times from 

• r r 



j cove where ev - 'ry i \ a y i 
la's edge, o'er stones and sand, 

the dis- tance he can hear 



i=fe4EE»: 



f3 



The 
And 
His 

-•- 



m 




crcs. 



pi 



tide flows in and 
many a fring - ing 



iv — i — L^— r — 5 — v 11 



A lone - ly bird in sob-er brown and 

He steals, or on the rock - y ledge doth 

Some-times the air rings with their music 




i_ I -^ dim. i . — -> unpoco rit. 

JrJ. l :i ^ ^«hJ i - ft r^l J II I J TTFH^ 



gray Limps pa - tient-ly a - bout, 
stand, Cry - ing, with none to heed, 
clear. Sonnd-ing from sea and sky, 



Limps pa- tient-ly a - bout. 
Cry - i 1 1 ir - with none to heed. 

Sound-ing from sea and sky. 




strong and 



The little sandpipers about him play, 
The shining waves they skim. 

Or round his feet they seek their food 
stay, 
As if to comfort him. 



and 



And then, oh then, his tender voice, so 6 
sweet . 
I- shaken with his pain. 
For broken arc his pinions 
fleet, 
Never to soar again. 

Wounded and lame and Languishing he 7 My pity cannot help him. though his plaint 

lives, Brings tears of wistfulness; 

Once glad and blithe and free, Still musl he grieve and mourn, forlorn 

And in his prison limits frets and strives and faint, 

His ancient self to be. None may his wrong redress, 

Words by permission of Houghton, Mifflin it Co. 

(84) 



Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Eddt. 



The Wounded Curlew. 

8 bright-eyed boy! was there no better 9 O children, drop the gun, the cruel stone! 
way Oh, listen to ray words '. 

A moment's joy to gain. And hear with me the wounded curlew 

Than to make sorrow that must mar the moan — 

day Have mercy on the birds ! 

With such despairing pain? 



56 



A Cry for Liberty, 



Anon. 



If. W. Seeley. 




1. O Lib - er -ty ! sweet Lib - er-ty! I pine and faint for thee ! Fain 

2. E'en though my lit- tie dai - ly needs Each morn-ing are sup-plied, A 

3. I loathe the sil - ver - sand - ed floor, The bars of glit-t'ring brass ; I 

4. Then would I mount to a - zure heights, And chant my Ma - ker's praise; 'Midst 



BQ 



M 






0— 



B 



i 



FW 



i 






^ Chorus. 



§ 



9iu 



-•— 



would I burst my pri - son bars, And soar a - mong the free ! O 

hum - bier fare were sweet - er far With fet - ter'd wing un-tied. 

long to build my lone - ly nest 'Neath corn or tan -gled grass, 

strains of grate -ful mel - o - dy Glad e - choes would I raise. 



f -< 



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i 



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Ml 



Li 



ber - v ! sweet Li 



ber - ty ! When wilt thou come to 



-t 



sel me free? 



PH 



From English " Band of Mercy. 



(85) 



57 



Bird Thoughts. 



Affetuoso. 



iiiiMW An:. 

Ait. i>\ Geo. II. Lom is 



1. I lived once in a lit - tie house, And lived there ver - y welT; . . 

2. One day I Hut- tered from the nest To see what I could find. . . 



;ii? 



si Is || J j is j s **♦ 






J- j =d 



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a 



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1 thought the world was small and round, And made of pale hlue shell. . 
I said: "The world is made of leaves, I have heen ver - y blind." 



ft-b-*- 



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SHEE^Ei 



• 



asi§ 



ill 



s s s 



r :: iriftriii 



9*i* 






.-=1 — *- 









P 



^^=g{^»^§^^^^ 



I lived next in a lit - tie nest, Xor need - ed a - ny oth - er; 

At length 1 Hew he-yond the tree, Quite fit for grown-up la - bora 



fe 



E ^&"H '/ z W^w^ 



.. 



^H^l 



53 If f|| 



m^L^T |g| 



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m 



(86) 



Bird Thoughts. 







s - 



II 



I thought the world was made of straw. And brood - ed by 
I don't know how the world is made. And neith - er do 



:.;> 



HHi-H^i 



m& 






my moth-er. 

inv iK'igh-bors 









m 

ii 



58 



Oei.i.v Thaxter. 
Sprightly. 



Yellow Bird 



L. B. Marshall. 
cres. . ^ | 



& 



a 



4^3=* 



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*=t 



l. Yel - low -bird, where did you learn that song. Perched on the trel - lis where 

_. Where do you hide such a store of de - light, del - i - cate crea-tnre, 

3. To think we are neigh - bors of yours! how fine! (). what a pleas - ure to 

4. Send up your full notes like wor - ship - ful prayers; Yel - low - bird, sing while the 




grape - vines clam -her, In and out flut - ter-ing, all day long. With your gold-en 

ti - ny and slen-der. Like a mel-low morning sun - beam bright And o - ver-flow 
watch you to - geth - er. Bring -ing your ferndown and floss to re - line The nest worn thin 
sum-mer's be- fore you; Lit- tie you dream that in spite of their cares. Here's a whole tain 




■)■ 



breast be - dropped with am - her? With your gold-en 
ing with mu - sic ten - der! And o - ver-flow -ing 
by the win - ter weath-erl The nest worn thin by 
i - lv. proud to a - dore you! Here's a whole fain -i 

-*- " I 

+-• f- f t -*~ 



M^r* 



*=£ 



breast be-dropped with am-ber? 

with mu - sic ten - der! 
the win - ter weath-erl 
ly proud to a - dore you! 

[ * t 
l L P 



i i 

Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Eddi. 



• 'i^MI 



Words by permission of H< 



CGBTOS, M:kflin a- Co. 



59 



Lines to a Seabird 



M . a. Stodari . 
Moderato 



E. P. Russbll 




1. Bird of the Btorm - y wave! bird of the sea] 

2. Bird of the sea! I could en - vv thv ^vi n<r, 



\Viil<' is thy 
O'er the blue 



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;\veep, and thy course is free; 

wa - ters I mark thy glad spring; 



Cleav - ing the blue air. and 
I see thy strong pin - Ions afl 



p fi j i i ,=r^ iTrnTf^-i N \ \ i 



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brush- ing the foam. Air is thy field of sport, o - cean thy home. 

on - ward I glide. Dashed by the foam of the white crest-ed tide. 




wmmmmmmmm 

w , \ » »u i i I J- ir >q ] 



Copyright, K'7, i>y s. J. Kddt. Worda from "Humane Edocator," England. 

(88) 



60 



Don't Kill the Birds. 



DANIKL C. COLttSWORTHT. 

1st. and 2d. Sop. 



4 h ,* N N * v 

^j 3 1 3. 3 3=j^ E£ 




1. Don't 

2. Don't 

3. Don't 
Alto. 



kill 
kill 
kill 



the birds, the 
the birds, the 
the birds, the 



— Pv 



-R — FV 



H. A 

— IS 



Clarke. 



lit - tie birds, That sing 
lit - tie birds,That play 
hap - py birds, That bless 



^m 



a - bont your door, Soon 
a- mong the trees ; ' Twould 
the field and grove, So 



SlEEjEfeEg! 



-±=±±z, 



?—*- 



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2^ 



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—j— 



as the joy - ous spring has come, And chill - ing storms are o'er, The 

make the earth a cheer -less place Should we dis - pense with these. The 

in - no -ceut to look up - on, They claim our warm - est love. The 




^r 



V 



P'i. J 




lit - tie birds, how sweet they sing ; Oh, let them 
lit - tie birds,how fond they play! Do not dis 
hap - py birds, the tune - ful birds, How pleas- ant 



joy- ous live, And 
turb their sport ; But 
'tis to see; No 



#=^ 






hT-zT 



w 



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+ ■#■ 








nev - er seek to take the life Which you can nev - er give, 
let them war - ble forth their songs Till win - ter cuts them short, 
spot can be a cheer - less place Wher - e'er their pres - ence be. 



I, J. Kddt. 



f 



II 



Copyright, 1897, by 



=F 



-$ 



(89) 



61 



Spring Song. 



Sophia S. Bixby. 
Lively. 



W. XV. Cil< HRIST. 



Sfet 



v- 



> 



1. All 

2. Down 



the 
by 



dear song - birds are 
tin 1 brook in a 



with us a - gain, 

bloa - som - ins tree, 



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Out 
Rock'd 

-9- 


in 
in 


the 
a 


or - chard to 
(lain - ty bTOWB 


- day; 

nest, 


Gai 

Five 


- ly the 
lit - tie 


o - 

rob - 


ri - ole 

ins arc 


1 1 1 


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c 


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Bang 
Bing 



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to its male 
ing pec]». prep. 



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•Win - tcr has all gone 
Safe 'neath the moth - er - 



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a - 

bird's 



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breast 



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From "The Child's Garden of Song." Per. a C. Mi I Li eo A Co.„Puh., Chicago 

(DO) 



Spring Song. 



Chorus. 



-£ 



Whip - poor - will, 



Bob 



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link. 



Chee - a 



r 



chee - chee. 



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Sweet -ly the bird - ies are sing-ing. Sum - mer is com - ing as 

J J -I - -J -i 4 



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sure as can be — Hear the sweet li - ly bells ring 



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(91) 



3Mjry. ; i .j. ii 



62 



Robert of Lincoln, 



W. C. Bryant. 
Brightly. 



Wm. L, Glover. 



l. Mer-ri-ly sing-ing od bri-ar and weed, Near to the nest of his lit -tie (lame. 
•_'. Rob-ert of Lin-coln is gay - ly drest,Wear-ing a bright-black wed-ding ooat; 

3. Six white eggs on a bed of hay, Frec-kled with purple, a pret-ty sight! 



•- -•- -#- -#- -•- -#- -•- -•- -#- -•- -0-, 



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O-ver the mountain-side or mead, Rob-ert of Lincoln is tell-ing his name. 
White are his shoulders. and white his crest, Hear him call his mer - ry note: 
There as the moth - er sits all day, Hobert is sing-ing with all his might 



^u 







Bob -o'-link.Bob-o'link. Spink, spank, spink :Bnbo'link,Bob-o'-link,chee,chee,chee, 
Bob -o'-link,Bob-o'-link,Spink,8pank,spink :I>obo'link,Bob-o'-link,chee,chee,chee, 
Bob -o'-l ink, l>ob-o'-link,Spink, spank, spink ;Bobo'link,Bob-o'-link,cl)ee,chee,cliee, 

I- 




Snng and safe in that nest of ours, Ilid-den a- mongthe stim-mer flow'rs. 

Look what a nice new coat is mine, Sure there was never a bird so line. 

Nice good wife, that nev -er goes out, Keep-ing house while I frolic a - bout. 

Ill ill 



Bi 7=*: 



o 






(92) 



:=8-;=J 



gn 



i i ■* 



63 



The Constant Dove. 



I ! I I \ TllAXTKR. 

With deep interest. 



L. B. M utSH \r.T . 



a 



— 



1. The white dove sat on the 



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i 



He prohed each crack with his slen - der heak, And 



Bun-ny eaves, And "What will yon do when the 
much too bus-y he 




north wind grieves?" She said to the bus-y nut-hatch small, Tap-ping a-bove in the 
was to speak. Spiders, thattho't themselves safe and sound, And moths and flies and co- 
■^V - . .0. m * V~V _ .T\ « JTUL 



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ga - ble tall, Tap -ping a-bove in the 

coons he found. And moths and flies and co 



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r 

ga - ble tall. 
coons he found. 



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mmm 



3 Oh! but the white dove she was fair, 
Bright she shone in the autumn air, 
Turning her head from the left to the right : 
Only to watch her was such delight! 

4 " Coo ! " she murmured, " poor little thing, 
What will you do when the frosts shall stim:": 
spiders and flies will be hidden or dead, 
Snow underneath and snow overhead." 



He laughed so loud that his laugh I heard. 
"How can you be such a stupid bird! 
What are yonr wings for, tell me. pray, 
But to bear you from tempests and cold away ? 

" Merrily off to the south I fly, 
In search of the summer, presently, 
And warmth and beauty 1*11 find anew. 
Why don't you follow the summer, b 



.") Xuthatch paused in his busy care: 8 But she cooed content on the sunny eaves. 

■And what will you do. <> white dove fair?" And looked askance at the reddening leaves; 
"Oh, kind hands feed me with crumbs and And grateful I whispered : "O white dove true, 

grain, I '11 feed you and love you the winter 

And I wait with patience for spring again." through." 

Copyright. 18«7, by S. J. Eddy. Words bv permission of SOUOHTO*, Mifflin A Co. 

(93) 



64 



The Little Maiden and the Little Bird. 



Lyima M mji v Child. 



Little Songs for Little Singers.*' 



J r ~T- "M* 


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1 


1. "Lit-tle bird ! lit-tle bird 

2. •• Thanks, little maiden, for 

3. '• Xay.lit-tle dam-sel. a - 

4. " Lit-tle bird ! lit-tle bird 
.">. •• No. lit - tie maiden ! Go 

■f-r 


! come to me! I have a green cage all ready for thee, — 
all thy care. But I love dear - ly, the clear, cool air, 
way I'll fly To greener fields and warm-er sky ; 
who'll guide thee O-ver the hills and o-ver the sea? 
dgnides me O-ver the hills and o-ver the sea; 


C< i 


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Beanty bright flow'rs I '11 bring a - new. And fresh. ripe cherries all wet with dew.' 

And my snug nesl in the Old oak tree." •• Lit-tle bird ! litttle bird ! slay with me." 

When spring returns with pattering rain, You'll hearmymer-ry song a -gain." 

Fool-ish din'. come in the house to stay, For I'm ver - y sinv you'll lose your way. 

I will be free as the rush-ing air. And sing of sun-shine ev - 'ry-where,' 




P^ppfep^'i 



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(94) 



65 



Marjorie. 



Cm i v Thaxtkr. 




H. A. 
N V n V 


Clarke. 

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1. Mar-jo-rie hides in the deep sweet grass; Par -pie its tops bend o - ver; 

2. Up to the top of the grass so tall Creep they while Marjo-rie gaz - es; 


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S "t-iy and warmly the breezes pass. And bring her the scent of the 
Bkms the wind sad-den-ly — down they fall In - to the disks of the 


clo - 
dai - 


ver. 
sies ! 


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Rut - ter-flies flit, and the band - ed bee Booms in the air a - bove her; 
Hap-py sweet Mar-jo - rie hid-den a -way. Birds. bnt-ter-flies. bees. a - bove her;With 


t y ' 




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Green and gold - en la - dy - bags three Mar - jo-rie's nest dis - cov - er. 
flow'rs and perfumes and la - dv - buirs gay; Ev - 'rvthing seems to love her 



*=*=* 



• • -•-#--*- -9- 



9— 



^-—'s \ 



m 



- by permission of Houghton. Mifflin <fc Co. 



(95) 



66 



Answer to a Child's Question. 



S. T. Coleridge. 

Andante. 



G. II. LomaS. 



S*± 



>-4— »--» 



5 



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1. Do you ask 

2. "I love 



what the birds say? The spar -row, the dove, 

and I love," al - most all the birds say, 



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The lin-net, and thrush say, "I love and I love." In the win-tor they're si -lent, 
From sunrise to star - rise, so glad-some are they. But the lark is so brim-ful 



6 






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the wind is so strong ; What it says I don't know, but it sings a load song. 
of glad- ness and love, The green -fields be -low him, the blue sky a-bove, 



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s 



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Copyright. 1887, by S. J. Eddt. 



(96) 



Answer to a Child's Question. 



Bmmmmmmmmwm 



But green leaves and blossoms,and sun-ny warm weather, And singing and lov-ing— all 
That lie sings and he sings and for ev - er sings lie, "I love my love, and 



9-i 



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come back to - geth - er. 
my love loves me. 

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'Tis no won 



der that he's full of 



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joy 



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to the brim, When he loves his love, and his love loves him. 



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(97) 



67 



v 



The Caged Bird's Lament. 

Worda from "The Animal World." 

• ■-■ — 3— » ■ • ■ 



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1. There was a time 
_'. There was a time 
3. Con - lined with-in 






E| 



I used to sing For ver - y joy the whole day long 
1 wandered free Gay as the sunahine,free as air 
this gloomy place,Scarce large e-nongh to turn me in, 



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A hap - py, glad ■ 

< >Vr hill and dale 
As though I were 



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some lit - tie thing, My heart as joy-ons as my song! 

and dais-ied lea, Nor knew the shad-ow of a care; 

in sore dis-grace, And had to ex - pi - ate my sin, 



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There was a time when, in my nest, Sur- rounded by a chirping brood, 

Bnt now, a- las! how sad the change — Xo more o'er hill and dale 1 roam; 



sit, and try to sing a - way The drea-ry hours, so dull, so Long 



■)■■:. 



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With joy tOO great 
No more thro' leaf 
That what was once too short 



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to be expressed, I dealt a-round the welcome food. 
y groves I range, The nest no long-er is my home! 
day Un-end-ingseems.des-pite my song] 



::•_«_«- 



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Englld) " Hani of Merry Melodies. 



(98) 



68 



Don't Rob the Birds, Boys. 



Axon. 
Andantino 

4 




' 1/ 1 






Hattik M. Vose. 

At-4 



* • 



Btrp 



1. Don't rob the birds of their eggs,bovs,'Tis cru- el and heartless and wrong; Andre 






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member,by breaking an egg, boys, We may lose 



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a bird with a song. 2. When 



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care-worn, wea-ry, and lone - ly, Some day as you're passing a - long, You'll re - 



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joice that the egg -was -n't brok - en, That gave you the bird with its song. 



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69 



Emily Hun riNGTON Muxi k 
With brilliancy. 



My Neighbors, 



Leonard B. Marshall. 



B . j fig ^=^^ 



1. Up in tln> ap - pie-tree, o - ver the way, 
-. Un - der my win - dow, where ros-es en -twine, 
3. Swal-lows are twit- fcer - ing an -der my i 



Hob - in, 



m 



my 

Lives the brown 
Thrushes arc 



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neigh-bor, is bus 
spar -row, a neigh 
sing - ing a - mong 



y all day. 
bor of mine, 
the green leaves, 



3St 



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When the sweet morn is be 
(lose by the lat - tice, a 
Black-birds are pip - ing a 



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ginning to gleam, 

mong the green bonghs, 

uiu-si - eal lay, 



m ■ l> , -F — — l\ — I — \ — 

* — y— -4^ — v — # — L v * ■ j;. j . 



Through the white blossoms he flits like a dream. 
Rock s, like a era- die, her snug lit - tie house. 
Decs iii the clo - ver are dron-ing all day. 



N'AV.V^..^. <>.>.:. ~. : 



colli voci. 



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Copynglii, 1897, b> S, J. Ej>PT, 



(100 ) 



My Neighbors. 



a tempo 



ores. 




When the sweet morn is 
Close by the lat-tice, 
Blackbirds are pip - ing 



be - gin-ning to 
a - mong the green 
a mu - si - cal 



i a — y - — H 3 * — P— i * 9 '— - 1 



gleam, 
boughs, 
lay, . 



Thro' the white blossoms he 

Rocks, like a era - die, her 

Bees in the clov - er are 




-*- -J -f * 9 + -*- -*- -+ -*- • • ■* -•- • -•- 



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--, 




a tempo. 






mm 



flits like 



a wild car -ol, 



hap - py and clear, 



snug lit - tie house. Up in my face, with her in - no - cent eyes 



dron-ing all day. 



Blithe lit - tie neighbors ! so mer - ry and free, 



V 



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(101) 



My Neighbors. 






car - 01, BO 
face, with her 
neigh-bors! so 



hap - py 

in - no 
mer - ry 




and clear, 
cent eyes, 
and free, 



/ / / / 

Thro' all my dreaming it 

my wee neigh-bor with 

Spar-row, and Rob-in, and 







■* 



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steals on my ear; 
tini - id sur- prise 
Swal-low, and Bee, 



Rob-in's my 

Nes-tles a 
One lov - ing 



gar - den - er, 
lit -tie as 
Fa-ther keeps 



lion - est and 
if she wonld 
watch of ns 



"I ~ r | i 



i . i . ^fif j 




bold - 
Bay, 

all, 



Rob-in's my min-strel, nn - paid by 

i but a feath - er, I'm np and 

Car -ing a - like for the great and 



t 

my gold. 

a - waj '.' 
the small. 



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(102) 



70 



A Finished Nest. 



Anon. 



Paul Ambrose. 




i r i i i* i 7 » 



i i ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ i 

1. Hid-den by the sha - dy tan - gle They have toiled with beak and breast, 

2. Who can view such art - ful la- bor Rent and spoilt with - out a sigh? 

— r— ,» fa* P P rrP P f 2 - 



m*£+= *r? 




Till green leaf and ro - sy span-gle Smile a -round a fin-ished nest. 

Who would hurt his tune - ful neighbor Of the lov - ing heart and eye? 



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Who that beauteous nest would ri - fie With a rude and un-just hand? 
Spare the feathered wood - land rov-er; Let him work and love and sing! 



EgjEE 



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Who that mu - sic rich would stifle, Ere it float -ed o'er the land? 
Soon his lit - tie day is o - ver, And he folds his wea-ry wing. 



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(103) 



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71 



The Brown Thrush. 



6 



Li I v LARCOM. 

Cheerfully. 



I.i <>\ \i:i> I'.. M IR8HALL 



£== 



s . 



1. There's a nier - ry brown thrush sit-ting up in the tree, 

_' And the brown thrush keeps sing - tag, "A nest do you see, 

■\. So the nier - ry brown thrush sings a- way in the tree, 




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He's sing-ing 
And five eggs, hid 
To you and 



to 
by 
to 



me 
me 
me 






He's sing-ing 
in the ju - ni 
to you and 



to me!" 
per - tree? 
to me ; 





JRH 



± 



And what does he say, 

Don't med - die! don't touch! 

And he sings all the day, 



lit -tie girl, 
lit -tie girl, 
lit -tie girl, 



9 v ' 

lit -tie boy? 
lit -tie boy, 
lit -tie boy, 



^ 1 — — — — z • 



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"Oh, the 
Or the 

"Oh, the 




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Copyright, 1867, by S. J. KddY. Words by permission of HOUOBTOH, Mifflin <fe Co. 

(104) 



The Brown Thrush, 



I 



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m& 



world's nm-ning o - ver with 

world will lose some of its 

world's run-ning o - ver with 



joy! .... Don't you hear? 
joy! .... Now I'm glad! 
joy! .... Don't you know'.' 

tr 



don't you 
now I'm 
don't you 



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see? Hush! look! hush! look! in my tree! Don't you hear! don't you see? Hush! 

free! And al - ways shall be, shall be, XowI'm glad! now I'm free! And 

see? But long it won't be, won't be, Don't you know? don't you see? But 

LJ_ __ 




•' 



-J Hi I^TH 






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look ! in my tree 
al - ways shall be, 
long it won't be, 



I'm as happy as happy can 
If you never bring sorrow to 
Un - less we're as good as can 



be!' 
me.' 
be.' 



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(105) 




II 



72 



The Linnet. 



Robbb i Burns (adapted) 
Moderato. 



J. A. Wadman. Sweden. 



a tempo. 



, W»ix 



^ 



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With-in the bush her cov - ert 



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jD ritardando. 



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nest, 



A lit - tie lin 



net fond - ly prest ; 



The dew sat 



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nrrir- ;r 



chil - ly on 



her breast 



Sae ear - ly in the morn 



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53 



(100) 



The Linnet. 




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fresh green leaves be - dewed, 



A - wake the ear - ly morn 



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(107) 



73 



( ill \ I'll \\ ! BR. 



i 



C 



The Sparrows. 

(DIE SPURVER.) 



Paul A.mbrosb. 



•— 



■ 



1. In the far - off 
_'. Through nil the 



land 
land 



of 

the 



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No r 
chil 



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way, Where the 
dren In the 



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win - ter lin - gers 
groZd - en fields re 



5 • 



n Klin. 

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And 



/o»f/ for the sing 



Till their bus - y 



lit 



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tie 



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birds and (lowers, The 
hands have gleaned A 



lit - tie 
r/en - 'rons 



chil • 

sheaf 



dren 
of 



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wait; 

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When 
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Copyright, 1897, l>y S. J. Kddt. Words by permlMiOD of BOUGHTOW, MirPLll 

(108) 



The Sparrows. 




3 And then through the frost-locked country 

There happens a wonderful thing: 
The sparrows flock north, south, east, west, 

For the children's offering. 
Of a sudden, the day before Christmas, 

The twittering crowds arrive, 
And the bitter, wintry air at once 

With their chirping is all alive. 

4 They perch upon roof and gable, 

On porch and fence and tree. 
They flutter about the windows 

And peer in curious///. 
And meet the eyes of the children, 

Who ear/erly look on£ 
With cheeks that bloom like roses red, 

And greet them with welcoming shout. 



On the joyous Christmas morning, 

In./ron$ of every door 
A tall pole, crowned with clustering grain, 

Is set the birds be/ore. 
And which are the happiest, truly 

It would be hard to /e//; [cheer, 

The sparrows who share in the Christmas 

Or the children who love them well! 

How sweet that they should remember, 

With faith so full and sure, 
That the children's bounty awaited them 

The whole wide country o'er! 
When this pretty story was £ota me 

By one who had helped to rear 
The rustling grain for tin merry birds 

In JVorway, many a year, 



8 I thought that our little children 
Would like to know it too, 
It seems to me so beautiful, 

So Messed a thing to do. 
To make God's innocent creatures see 

In erery child a friend, 
And on our faithful kindness 
So/earlessly depend. 
As these verses differ in so many instances the only way to ensure a fitting of words and music is 
to sing the italicized syllables with the first beat of each measure. 

(109) 



74 



Our Happy Secret, 



Words by permission of Margaret Sidnbt. 



\m. i Pitman Wi sli v 



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'_>. I didn't lis- ten! I 
3. Do vou think I'd tell— Ohl 



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tell you true, 
dear me, no!- 



Ont of the midst of an 

They told it,— and I — 
dust wherethat wee nest is 




old ap- pie tree, 

Say, what could I do? 

go - ing to grow? 



Came to me soft, with a chirp - ing note — 

Tl Li y sang it and sang it, not look -ing at me. Who 
You could - n't find, if a week you tried, 




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Out popped the se-cret from dear lit - tie throat: 

sat look -ing out at the old ap - pie tree: 

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"dust here, jnsl here, the 
"Just where, just wherethat 



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The Humming-Bird. 



T. F. Seward. 



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1. The humming-bird! the humming-bird! So fairy-like and bright; It lives a-mongthe 

2. Like liv-ing tires they flit about, Scarce larger than a bee, A-mongthe broad pal 

3. Thouhappy,hap-py humming-bird, Xowin-ter round thee lowers; Thounev-ersaWst a 

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leaf-less tree, Nor land without sweet flowers. 



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In ra - diant is-lands of the South, Where 

All crim-son is her shining breast, Like 

A reign of sum-mer joy - f ul-ness To 



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fragrant spi-ces grow, A thousand, thousand humming-birds Go glancing to and fro. 
to the red, red rose ; Her wing the changeful green and blue That on the peacock glows, 
thee for life is giv'n : Thy food the hon-ey from the rlo\v'r,Thy drink the dew from heav'n. 



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The Snow-Birds. 



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all the shrubs are eased in ice. And ev 
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sealed . Then come the lit - tie 

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gar - den, A-round the na - ked 
snow-birds As beg-gars to your 
wel-come,It sure-ly were not 



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ev - 'ry ti-ny crumb, With 
sing in win-ter-time Should 




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(112) 




The Snow-Birds 



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Happy Birds. 



Axon. 



From B. A. Weber. 



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Hap-py hap-py bird* 



Ev - er on the wins ! 



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S Hap - py in the summer, Work -ing all in love; 
'(Fall to o - ver - flowing, Hap-py as the day. 



Hap-py in your 
In the liv - ing 
Singing with the 
Skimming with voting 



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si - lence. Hap-py when you sing, 
land-scape. Green and white and gold 
wood-thrush. Coo-ing with the dove ! 
nest-lings, O'er the new mown hay ! 



In the liv - ing land-scape. 



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O'er the new mown hav [Skimming with voting nestlings, O'er the new mown hav : 



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(113) 



78 



The Faithful Little Bird. 



Mi»> MULOCH. 

Modi rait 



Arr. from KuCKEN. 




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79 



Life in the Nest. 



J. L. H. 

AUegreUo moderato 
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1. Blithe-ly twit-ting, Gai - ly flit-ting Thro' the bnd-ding glen; 

2. Brisk as ev - er, Quick and clev-er, Brimming with de - light— 

3. "Mother's flag-ging, Father's lagging," Says a spar-row rude. 
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Geld- en-crest -ed, 
Twelve wee beauties 
"Fie! what story— 




Sun -ny-breasted. Goes the ti - ny wren. 
Bring new du-ties, Work from morn till night. 
All our glo - ry Is a well-nursed brood." 



Peep-ing, mus-ing, Picking,choosing, 
Peep-ing, mus-ing, Picking. choosing. 
Wing grows weary, Love still cheery, 



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Xook is found at last: Moss and feather Twined together— Home is shaped at last. 
Nook is found at last ; Moss and feather Twined together— Home is shaped at last. 
Keeps un - ruf - fled breast : No such treasure. No such pleasure As our well-filled nest. 




English " Band of Mercy Melodies.' 



(115) 



80 



Anon. 



The Little Bird's Nest. 

Charuk Rba. Ait. by J. C. M. 



ModeraU hi (juick 
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1. If ev-er I see, on bash or tree, Young birds in their pret- ty nest, 

2. And when they can fly in bright bine sky, They 11 warble a song to me; 



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must not in play steal the birds a - way, To grieve their moth- er's breast. 
then. if I'm sad, it will make me glad To think they are hap-py and free. 



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davs are cold, and the vear grows old. They'll fly from th»drcar-v north, 



So I'll 
And 



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speak to the birds in my sof t - est words.Nor hurt them in my play, 
joy-ful-ly sing till re-turn of Spring, In groves »f the sun - ny BOUth. 



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(116) 



81 



WniTTIER. 



The Worship of Nature. 



II. A. Clarke. 






1. The harp at Xa-ture's a<l - vent strung, Has nev - er ceased to play; . The 

2. The green earth sends her in - cense np From many a moun-tain shrine; . From 
5. The blue sky is the tern -pie's arch, Its tran-sept earth and air, . . . The 



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son? the stars of morn - ing sun?, Has nev - er died 
fold - ed leaf and dew - y cup, She pours her sa - 
mu - sic of its star - ry march The cho - rus of 



a 

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way. 
wine. 
prayer. 



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3. The mists a - hove the morn -ing rills, Kise white as wings of prayer; The 

4. The winds with hymns of praise are loud, Or low with sobs of pain; The 

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al- tar curtains of the hills Are sun-set's pur-ple air. 
thunder or-?an of the cloud, The 



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drop-pin? tears of rain. 
-• •— • • 



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Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Eddy. Words by permission of HocGHTO*, lilTTLll 

(117) 



S2 



The Song of the Dancing Waves. 



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Mo, I, rain. 



A Swedish Song. 



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l. Shin- Log and spark-ling we dance a- long, 
3. Swift- ly and light -ly we speed the ships, 



With soft, foam - y 

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ed - gea up - curled , 
treasures a - way, . 



Sing-ing for-ev-er the same 
O - ver the o - cean to dis - tant 



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The Song of the Dancing Waves. 



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son?, We've sung from the dawn of the world, 

lands. On thro' the foam and the spray; 



We sing of the 
And skimming a 



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long happy simi - mer days On some white 
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playthings, the pink sea-shells, Far a- way out of our reach, 

dip -ping with glanc - ing wings, Creatures of air and of light. 



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2. Dancing andglanc-ing we strive to catch The bright rain - bow 



4. Danc-ing and sing- ing, thus on we go, 



On till the 



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tints of the sun; . . 
bright day- light dies; . . 



And with our comrades, the lit - tie sea 
Spark-ling and gleaming when twink - ling 



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The Song of the Dancing Waves. 



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fish, 

stars. 



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shine on as out of the skies. 



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And rlash-ing a - 



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dash in rock - y nooks 
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Makes with her sil - ver light, Ev - er we're 

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ur-chins and lim *- pets live, 
sing-ing our hap - py song, 



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Each day we mer-ri - ly glide. 
All through the fair, si - lent night. 



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(121) 



83 



Carnival of Spring. 



Trio for I 

Margaret J. Preston. 

u s_ - - * N N 



T AND 2ND Sol'. AND Alio. 



II. A. ( LARKJ . 




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1. Lis-ten! what a sudden rus- tie Fills the air! 

2. Through the vibrant air a-tin-gle,Buz-zing-ly, 

3. Aspen tas-sels thick are dropping All a - bout, 




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All the birds are in a bus -tic 
irobfl and o'er me sails a sin -gle 
And the alder-leaves are cropping 



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Ev-erywhere. 
Bum-ble - bee. 
Broad-er out ; 
-w t-fi 9-g— 

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Such a cease-less croon and twit-ter O - ver - head! 
Lis- som sway - ings make the wil-lows One bright sheen, 
Up and down are mid - ges dancing On the grass; 



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Such a flash of wings that glitter Wide outspread! Far a-way I hear a dramming, - 

Which the breeze puffs out in billows Foani-y green. From the marshy brook that' ssniokin: 
How their gau-zy wings are glancing As they pass! What does all this haste and hurry 




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(122) 



Carnival of Spring. 




Tap, tap, tap! 

In the fog, 

Mean, I pray- 



Can the wood peck-er be coming Af - ter sap? 

I can catch the crool and croaking Of a frog. 

All this out door flush and flur - ry Seen to - day? 



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But - ter - flies are hovering o - ver (Swarms on swarms) 
Dog-wood stars the slopes are stud - ding, And I see 

This pres - sag - ing stir and hum-ming, Thrill and call ? 




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Yonder meadow patch of clo-ver, Like snow-storms. 
Blooms up - on the pur-ple bud-ding Ju - das tree. 
Meant it means that spring is coming; That is all! 




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(123) 




84 Each Little Flower that Opens, 

Mrs. C. F. Aii \ lndbr. (Adapted.) 



German Air. 




1. Bach lit - tie flow r 

2. The cold wind in 



that o - pens, Each lit - tie bird that sings, Each 
the win - ter, The pleasant sum-mer sun, The 



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The rush - es by the riv - er - side We gath - er ev - 'ry day. 



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Each Little Flower that Opens. 




85 



Summer Things. 



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but - ter - cup blos-soms at play; Run-ning be 

nest - lings to sing chee, chee, chee! This means in 

thrif - ti - est fel - low a - live: Help - ing him 



tween them, and 
Eng - lish,"How 
self to the 



brook - let and car - ol of bird; Smiled on the bee as 



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laugh -ing all day. "Play with me, flow -era and chil - dren who may!' 

hap - py arc we! Rocked in the branch -es, O who would not be!" 

sweets that he lacks, Sip - ping the blos-soms for hon - ey and wax. 

buzzed on the way. "I will be bus - y and hap - py as they." 




From English '• Band of Mercy. 



(125) 



86 



Lullaby. 



Words arr. by K. D. W. 
^ Tenderly. 



II. s. Stedmak. 



IS 



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1. In your ti - ny nest now ly - ing, 

2. In his pret - ty era - die sleep - ing, 



Bird - Le dar-ling, go to 
Ba - by now will take bis 



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rest; See his eye-lids down are creeping, Like the bird-ie's in his nest. 







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Sleep now, ba - by, For thy mother's ev-er watching nigh ; Sleep now, ba-by, 



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( 126 ) 



Lullaby. 




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87 



O Painter of the Fruits and Flowers. 



1 O Painter of the fruits and flowers! 
We thank thee for thy wise design, 
Whereby these human hands of ours 
In Nature's garden work with thine. 

_' And thanks that from our daily need 
The joy of simple faith is born ; 
That he who smites the summer weed, 
Ma}" trust thee for the autumn corn. 



Tune:— "Park Street." 

3 Give fools their gold, and knaves their power 

Let fortune's bubbles rise and fall ; 
Who sows a field, or trains a flower, 
Or plants a tree, is more than all. 

4 For he who blesses most is blest ; 

And God and man shall own his worth, 
Who toils to leave as his bequest 
An added beauty to the earth. 



5 And, soon or late, to all that sow, 
The time of harvest shall be given ; 
The flower shall bloom, the fruit shall grow, 
If not on earth, at last in heaven. 

John Greenleaf Whittieb. 



Words by permission of Houghton, Mifflin <fc Co. (127) 



88 Praise June! 

Edith M. Thom ls. 

In strongly marked movement. 



Wm. L. Glover. 



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Praise 



Morn-ing and noon, And when the day clos - es, 



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J. J. 1 J. J. i j:-":{i i fc^ fe 



Praise June 



Praise 

eit. 



June! 



Praise for the do - ver, The 
songs, and a feasl In the 
' long day's light. And the 



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Copyright, 1*97, by S. J. Eddt. 



(128) 



Praise June ! 



gyp 



sy, the rov 



er, The 



of the 



ft- 



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By 



straw - ber - ry mead - ow, the straw - ber - ry mead - ow Where 



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way - side 
grass throws 
dew - y 


and lea! ... . ! 

a shad - ow, Where 
leaves shroud - ed, 

1 


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bob - 
Pipe 


for 
o - 
a 


the 
links 
short 

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splen - dor Of 

swing - ing Keep 

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blow - ing Where 




wind 


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lst& 2d endings S 3d ending. \ 



but-ter-fl y dressed From the booths, from the booth s of the East. For 
slow streams are flowing, Where slow streams are flowing,are flowing ; For the 
path for themoon, When the wind makes a path for the 



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89 



Down in the Grass. 



\\\ \ II. Branch, 
Allegretto. f = 100. 



Kate S. Chittenden 



1 m 4 — -J J- — f 5 — — ' — •"! L — ) - • d— 

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1 What did you get for the stoop -ing Down in the Krass so low?. . 1 

2. This much I got for the stoop - ing Down where the soft winds blew, . The 



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feel of the moist young green things That feed on the sun and dew, And the 



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dream of a song in a faint white flow'r Be- fore it be-gan to blow; And 
song that I learned from the small white fiow'r, It sing-eth the whole day thro'; This 

1 1 N 

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stoop - ing Down in the grass so 






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this I got for the stoop - ing Down in the grass so low. . 

much I gathered, a little young song That bloomed in the grass and grew. 



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CopjTight, 1897, by S. J. Eddt. Words by permission of " Tbe Independent." 

(130) 



90 

George Popi 
An da nie. 



Woodman, Spare That Tree. 

Morris. Johann Adam Hiller. 

mp 




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gle bough ! 
re - nown 

ful shade ; 
old friend ; 



1. Wood-man. spare that tree, Touch not a 

2. That old fa - mil - iar tree, Whose glo - ry 
8. When but an i - die boy, I sought its 
4. Mv heart-strings round thee cling Close as thy 



i 

sin - 
and 
grate 
bark, 




In youth it 
Are spread o'er 

In all their 
Here shall the 



shel-tered 

land and 
gash - ing 

■wild -bird 



me, 
sea — 

joy 

sing, 



And I'll pro - tect it now. 

And would'st thou hew it down? 

Here, too, my sis - ters played. 

And still thy branch -es bend. 




Twas my 
Wood-man, 

My moth 
Old tree, 



fore - fa -ther's 
for - bear thy 
- er kissed me 
the storm still 



hand 
stroke, 
here ; 
brave ! 



That placed 
Cnt not 
My fa - 

And, wood- 



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ther press'd 
man. leave 



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the 



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give this 

I've a 



let it 
a - ged 

fool - ish 
hand to 



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tear 
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it 



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Music from the arrangement used in " The Riverside Song-Book." By permission of Houghton, Mifflin <fe Co. 

(131) 



91 



Spring Blossoms. 



Anon 



. Allegretto. 



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Elizabeth Mitchell Allen. 



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1. With - in their down-y era - dies, Soft 

2. Come, pus - sy dear, and show us Where your 

3. Bright eyes and down-y feath - ers. Peep 

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pink and 

soft 

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gray and white, 

ba - bies sing; 

brood-ing wings; 

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The ten - der 

Xo sweet - er 

Each moth - er 



lit - tie 
lit - tie 
bird is 



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bios - soms all Are wak 
bios - soms Have op'd 
hap - py now, And with 



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ing to the light, 

their eyes this spring. 

all na - ture sings. 



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Spring Blossoms. 



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dark 
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win - ter, To warm white dawn of 

duck - lings Are swim - ming in the 

glad heart, The same sweet songs a 



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spring, 
sun, 
rise, 


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There's love 
And frogs 
For all 


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and 

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hope 


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and 


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joy - 
joy 


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Play, 

spring 


• 

There's 

Where 

Are 


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qui - et wa - ters run. 
in my ba - by's eyes. 



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92 



Up in the Morning. 



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1. "Up in the morn - Lng," hummeth the bee, Wing-ing its way by the 

2. "Up in the morn - ing," sing - eth the lark, Soar-ing a- way o-ver 

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flower and tree; Dewdrops aU spark-ling on bud and bloom, Meadows all 
field and park ; O-ver the tops of the mountains so high, Welcomes the 




Chorus. 






rich with the sweet-est per-fnme. 

sun in the bright gold- en sky. 

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Up in the Morning. 




green and fair, 



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93 



Andantino grazioso. 



Hidden Treasures. 



r p u nip 



Hattie M. Vose. 



T I II I 

1. Lit -tie peo - pie, do you know What is un - der-neath the snow ? Flow-ers 

2. Do you know what se - crets deep, All the woods of win -ter keep? Ah! the 

3. Lit- tie folks, now do you know, Feb-ru - a - ry soon will go? Then will 

JL_JL 



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pink and blue and white, Big red ro - ses all a - glow, In their 
dar - ling lit - tie things, Down be- low the snowbank's heap! Fern leaves 
come the sun - ny Spring, When the snows will melt, and oh! How the 



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dark roots fold - ed tight 

curled in ti - ny rings, 

mea - dow brooks will sing, 






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Till the mer 
Vio-let ba 
And the daf 

_ft 



ry south winds blow. 

bies fast a - sleep. 

fo - dil - lies blow. 






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Words by permission of the " Youth's Companion. 



(135) 



94 

Mary B. Wilkins 
]\'Hh expression. 



April Song. 



Leonaiu) B Marshall. 




1. Now wil- Lows have their pas - sies, Now ferns In mead - ow - lands . 

2. There's par -ring in a sun - beam Where Tab - by's ba-biea play. . 



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Hold lit - tie down - y 
The hen is soft - ly 



leaf 
brood 



lets, Like clinging ba - by hands. 

ingi Her chickens came to - day. 



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Like ro - sy ba - by fin 
Up in the crimson ma 






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gers Show oak-leaves 'gainst the bine; 
pie The moth - er rob - in sings; 



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Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Eddy. 



(lac; 



April Song. 



rit. 



r r r r 

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The lit - tie ones of na - tare Are ev - 'ry-Avhere in view, 
The world is full of car - ing For lit - tie help - less things, 




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The lit - tie ones of ua - ture Are ev - 'ry-where in view, 
The world is full of car - ing For lit -tie help -less things, 




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Are ev - 'ry-where in view, 
For lit - tie help -less things, 



Are ev - 'ry - where in view. 
For lit - tie help - less things. 



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(137) 



95 



Edith M. Thomas. 



The Day's Eye. 



Paul Ambrose. 




l. 

2. 
3. 
4. 

3 



What does 

What docs 

What does 

It sees 



the dai - sy see, 
the dai - sy see, 
the dai - sy see, 
the bobolink's nest 



In the 
Round the 
Down 
That no 



bree 

sun 

in 

one 



- /v mead-ow 

ny mead-ow 

the L r ras - sy 

else can dis • 




cinir? It sees the 



wide blue fields o 
butterflies' chase. 



thick - 
cov - 



ets? The grasshoppers green and brown, 
er, And the brooding mother-bird, 

-•- -J- -#- 



, Aixl 
And 
And 

With 



the lit - tie cloud-flocks 
the til - my gnats al their 
the shin-ing coal -black 
the float-tag <rrass a - 




cross-mi; 
danc- Ing 
crick-, t- 
bove her. 



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What does the 
What does the 
What does tin' 

What does the 

IS is 



dai - 

dai - 
dai - 
dai - 



see? 
see? 

ae< .- 
see? 



Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Eddy. 



^ 



What does the dai - sy Beef 

Whal doea the dai - By Beef 
What docs the dai - sy Bee? 
Whal does the dai - sy see? 

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(138) 



96 



A Summer Morning. 



William W 
Brilliantly. 



Caldwell. 



Leonard B. Marshall. 




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1. The morn is op ! The gold-en sun A - bove the sea - line 

2. A - long its devious course I hear The lit -tie brook-let 

3. Thro'groves of pine, with soothing fall, The sum-mer winds are 

4. Come one, come all, from slumber free, Now day is bright - ly 



;ho^Y 



glow 



ing 



All 
Now 

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the sun-light clear. Now talk-ing to the blue-bells near, 


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far 


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the bluebird's call, The o -riole in the elm-tree tall, 


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sweet bar - mo-nv. Where brook and bird and winds a-gree, 


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join 



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the twi - light shad -ows dun. Day's her -aids wa - ken, one by one. Day's 
ly in the sun -light clear. Now talk - ing to the bluebells near. Now 
far off the blue-bird's call. The o - riole in the elm tree tall. The 
in this sweet har - mo- ny. Where brook and bird and winds a-gree. Where 

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talk - ing 

o - riole 

brook and 



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wa 

to 

in 

bird 



ken 

the 

the 

and 



one by one, 
blue-bells near, 
elm - tree tall, 

winds a - gree, 



J 

And 
And 

And 
And 



chan 
chan 
chan 
chan 



-ti - cleer is 
-ti - cleer is 
-ti- cleer is 
-ti - cleer is 



crow - ing! 
crow - ing! 

crow - ing! 
crow - ing ! 



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i 



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Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Lddt. 



(139) 



97 



Hail to the Elm. 



N. S. Dodge. 

1st and '-'m> Sop., Alto, axd Bass. 



H. A. Clarke. 



. 



mmmmmmmmwm 



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Hail to the elm, the brave old elm! Our last lone for - est 

i J- 

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tree, 



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Whose limbs out - stand the light 



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ning's brand, For a 



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brave old 



elm 



he! 



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full - told years, lie has borne his leaf - y 



prime 



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Copyright, 1897, i >> s. J. Kddy. 



(140) 



Yet he 



Hail to the Elm, 




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holds them well, and lives to tell His tale of the old - en 



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(HI) 



98 



Autumn Sonor. 



Em i i.i i Poui 88OK. 



Emory P. Russki i 
v 




1. The Bong ■ 

2. The in - 

3. The Loud 

4. Jack. Frost 



birds are fly - ini:, 

are hid - ing, 

\vinds arc call - ing, 

will soon cov - er 



And south - ward arc hie - ing, \<> 

The far - mer pro - vid - Lag The 

The ripe nnts arc fall - ing, The 

The lit - tic brooks o - ver; The 




3= E*=3~:r= 






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more their glad car-ols 
Lamb-kins a shel-ter 
sqnir- rel now gath-ers 
snow-clouds are up 




we hear: 

from cold ; 

his store; 

the sky 



The gar- dens are lone - ly, Chrys- 

And af - ter Oc - to - ber The 

The b'ars. home-ward creep-in<:. Will 



All read 



for snow-inj 



Dear 






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an - thc-mnms on - ly 
woods will look so - ber 
soon all be sleep-ing 
go - ing! 



Au - tuinn is 



Dare now let their beau-ty ap - pear. 

With-out all their crim-son and gold. 

So snug - ly, till win-ter is o'er. 

We bid her a lov-ing ''good-bye.' 




Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Kddt. Worda from 



In the Child's World. 
(142) 



The Milt<>n Bradley Co., Springfield, Han, 



The Beautiful Woods, 



SAKAII 



Russell. 




the pleas- ant 
the joy - cms 
the peer -less 
the mas: - ic 



woods of Spring-time 
■woods of Sum - mer ! 
woods of An - tnmn ! 
woods of Win - ter ! 

J 



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! When ba - by ferns a - wake 
When un - der man - ties green, 
When flam -ing are the trees 
When snow-flakes in the air 

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Their ti - ny 

The for - est 

In taw - ny 

With spot - less 



tin - gers o-pen-ing, 
trees are gath-er-ing 
sun-light shim - mer-ing, 
robes are cov - er-ing 



While buds to blos-soms break. 
The sun -light's gold - en sheen. 
Or, flash - ing in the breeze. 
The branch-es brown and bare. 




The wal- nuts hang their tas - sels out, The wil- lows bend to greet 

In mos - sy dells, by tink- ling rills The birch -es, robed in white 

The ma- pies blush-ing, give their wealth, The chest-nuts show - er down 

The spruce and hem-lock, pine and fir, Are wear -ing still their green, 

& * fc ! I * & I R £ V — - I 

> i J A — i 4 — i — \ N — ! • i • ' — m — 0-. • — r 0- 



The 
Are 

Their 
And 



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cro - cus -es and 
guard - ed by the 
treas-nresrich, with 
thus through-out the 



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ant oak, 
less gems 
chang -ing year, 



vi - 

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price 



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Up-spring-ing at their 
Their stead- fa>t.>tal - wart 
From black oak's gold - en 
The love - lv woods are 

ft J* ]> 1 ! 

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feet, 
knight, 
crown, 
seen. 



I 



Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Eddt. 



(143) 



00 



The North Wind Doth Blow. 



Anon. 



Emory P. Russell. 



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wind doth 
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blow 
blow 
blow 

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shall 
shall 
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have 
ha\ e 

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what will 
what will 
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swal - lows do 
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snow - birds 



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then? 
then? 
then? 



Poor things! Oh! 
Poor things! They 
Poor things ! They'll 




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(144) 



poor 
poor 

poor 

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things ! 
things ! 
things! 



II 



101 



Home, Sweet Home. 



John Howard Payne. 




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nnri 



1. 'Mid pleas - ures and pal - a-ces though we may roam, 

2. I gaze on the moon as I tread the drear wild, 

3. An ex - ile from home, splendor daz - zles in vain; 



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Be it ev - er so 
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hum - ble, there's no place like home; 
moth - er now thinks of her child ; 
low - ly thatch'd cot - age a - gain ; 



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A charm from the skies seems to 
As she looks on that moon from our 

The birds sing-ing gai - ly, that 

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hal - low us there, Which, seek thro' the world, is ne'er met with else-where. 
own cot-tage door, Thro' the woodbine whose fragrance shall cheer me no more, 
came at my call; Give me them, and that peace of mind, dear - er than all. 



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Home, home, sweet, sweet home, 



Beit ev - er so hum-ble, There's no place like home. 

-0-0- 19- 




(H5) 



102 



Song of Liberty. 



A \(»N. 



Emory P. Russei i 



: ' 



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1. A shout, a shout, the night is gone, The clouds have passed a - way, 
•-'. A shout, a shout of tri - umph now, The vie - to - ry is ours; 



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The glo - rious light of Free-dom's sun Pours forth in floods of day. 
Not gained hy sword or hat - tie bow, But love's su - pe - rior pow'rs. 



^ 



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A shout, a shout, from sea to sea, 
A shout, a shout, from sea to sea, 

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A song from shore to 
A song from shore to 






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shore; 
shore ; 



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a tempo. 



I 



n7. 



The chain is riv'n, the slave is free, Free 
Four mil - lion death-less souls are free, Free 

I 



s 

to 
to 



be bound no more, 
be bound no more. 



25 • 



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r — r ==p — F 

Words used by arrangement with Oliver Ditson Company, owners of the copyright. 

(140) 



II 



103 The Morning Light Is Breaking. 

George T. Angell. H. Kotzschmar. 



Moderate 




mmm^ 



1. The morn-ing light is 

2. The morn-ing light is 

3. The morn-ing light is 



*- T 



break - ing, The dark - ness dis - ap - pears, 
break - ing, The dark - ness dis - ap - pears, 
break - ing, The dark - ness dis - ap - pears, 




iHli 



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rtmfVfrft 



The Bands of Mer - cy 
Hu - man - i - ty is 
Good tid - ings to all 

■=# r-l » 



i -•- 

com - ing Will bless all f u - ture years ; 

wak - ing, And peace on earth ap- pears; 

n a - tions, To set at rest all fears ; 

— P»«*— r— -rj : 





— m~i B 



For, lo, the days are hast 
The winds shall tell the sto 
And o - ver ev-'ry o 



'ning, By proph-et bards fore - told, 
ry, The waves shall waft it o'er, 
cean The sto - ry shall be borne, 



When, 
And 

Of 



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JJ J J^~ 1 T i ~^^ 
---#—• — Pi \ \ • — 4- 



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with the reign of 
now the age of 
kind - ness and pro 



kind 
glo 

tec 



ness, Shall come the 

ry, Shall come to 

tion To beast.and 



age 

ev - 'ry 

bird, and 



gold. . 
shore. 
man. 




->-•! by arrangement with Oliver DlTSOB Company, owners of the copyright. 

(147) 



104 



True Freedom, 



.1 vmk8 Russell Lowell. 



Geo. H. Lomas. 



Con ?i>i) 


'ito. Alia marcia. 

> > > > > 

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1. Men! 

2. Is 

3. They 

| 


whose boast 
true Free - 
are slaves 

r*i J 


it 

dom 

who 

rj 


-1 — 

is 

but 
fear 

| 


— * 1 

that ye 
to break 
to speak 


— P 

Come 
Fet - 
For 

-«- 


r 

of 
ters 
the 

-•- 


-*- 

fa - 

for 

fall 

-•- 


-* - 

1 

thers 
our 
- en 


Bt — 4— •— 


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brave and free, If there breathe on earth a slave, Are 
own dear sake, And with leath - ern hearts f or - get That 
and the weak ; They are slaves who will not choose Ha 

^ n J- x J. 

t 






ye tru - ly 
we owe nian- 
tred, scoff - ing, 



t=x 



i 




Copyright, 1897, by S. J. Eddt. 



Words by permission of Houghton, Mifflin & Co. 

CUB) 



True Freedom. 



r'n 1 


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rit. 










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slaves 


in - 


deed, 


Slaves 


un - 


wor 


- thy 


to 


be 


freed ? 




hand, 


to 


be 


Ear - 


nest 


to 


make 


oth 


- ers 


free! 




dare 


not 
K 

1- 


be 


In 


the 


right 


with 


two 


or 


three. 




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105 



Our Native Land 



W. E. HlCKSON. 


(Adapted.) 








Tune: ■ 


• America." 


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1. God 

2. May 

3. And 


-9- 

bless 

just 
not 


• -5- 

our na - 
and right - 
this land 

m 


9 9 

tive laud; 
eous laws 
a - lone. 

-•- -#- 


May 

Up 

But 

-•- 


Heav'n's 
- hold 
be 


pro - tect 
the pub 
thy mer 

-*- -# -. 


! 

- ing hand 

- lie cause, 

- cies known 




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Still 
And 
From 

# 


guard 
bless 
shore 


-#- 

our 

our 

to 


shore; 
name, 
shore ; 


May peace 
Home of 
Lord, make 

• • 


her 

the 

the 

-9- 


power 

brave 

na - 


ex -tend, Foe be trans- 
and free. Strong-hold of 
tions see That men should 

-9- -•- -0- -0- -0- 


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formed to friend, 
lib - er - ty— 
broth - ers be, 

-•-• -#- -0- 


And 
We 
And 

-#- 


1 1 

all our rights 
pray that still 
form one fam 

^ J"3 ♦• 


de-pend 
on thee 
• i - ly, 


LJ • 

On war no more. 
There be no stain. 
The wide world o'er, 

n i. * .. 


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(149) 



06 



Liberty, Love, and Peace. 



chaki.i - r. Brooks. 
Mou stoso. 



Ki i i.i as' "American Iivinn." 



H 



* z • 



* 



1. An - gel of Mer-cy 



mar 



slial forth 



So may thy ar - my be march-ing a - long 

I J— 



Thy Bands of 
To the 



,n: 



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Mer - cy o'er all 
mus - ic of an 

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the earth, Fanned by the snow - white ban-ner of love, 
gels' song, Till Mer-cy's strong and silk - en band 

i-4— 



F3 ^" -&-**•• 



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Con - q'ringthe world for the king-dom a - bove, 
Knits heart to heart and land to land, 



Con-q'ring 
Knits heart 







V 



Alusic used by arrangement with Oliver Pitson Company, owners of t lie copyright. 

(160) 



Liberty, Love, and Peace, 

mf 



cres. 



&=*: 



world for the king-dom a - bove 
heart and land to land, 

J=^-l i r—l 



Fling -ing the bean - ti - fnl 
Till war, op - pres - sion and 



faf tiVA LJ ' iilii 1 ^ Il'dfC^ 

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blaz - on a - broad, 
ha - tred cease, 



Kind - ness to all . . . the crea-tures of 
In the reign of Lib - er - ty, Love, and 



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107 



The Watchword. 



Ursula Tannknforst. 

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Time: "The Star Spangled Banner." 



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A - far o'er the strife with its star - span - gled greet - ing ; 
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its slum - ber. 
de - vo - tion! 



(152) 



The Watchword. 



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(153) 



108 



The Fatherland. 



Jambs Russell Lowell. 

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he bychance is born? Doth not the yearn- ing spir - it scorn In 

God, and man is man? Doth he notclaim a broad-er span 

wreath or Bor-row's gyves ; Where-e'er a hn -man sj>ir - it Btrlvea 

man mav help an - oth-er, Thank God for such a birth-riirht, brother, That 

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such scant bor - der's to be spanned? Oh, yes, his fa - ther -land must be 

For the soulslove of home than this? Oh, yes, his fa - ther -land must be 

Af-ter a life more true and fair. There is the true man's birthplace, grand, 

spot of earth is thine and mine, There is the trne man's birthplace, grand, 

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A.8 the bine heav-en. wide and free. As the bine heav-en. wide and 

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His Is a world-wide fa - ther -land. His is a world-wide fa- ther- land. 



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(154) 



109 

S. T. Coleridge. 



Closing Hymn 



" Naomi.'' 
Dr. L. Mason. 




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1. Fare - well, fare - well! but this I tell To thee, thou wed- ding guest! 

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(155^ 



fr The great advancement of the world, through- 
out all ages, is to be measured by the increase 
of humanity and the decrease of cruelty."* 

Sir Arthur Helps. 



(156) 



PART II. 



HUMANE EDUCATION. 

QUOTATIONS CONCERNING THE IMPORTANCE OF HUMANE EDUCATION. 

"Even* first thing continues forever with a child; the first color, the first music, 
the first flower paint the foreground of his life. The first inner or outer object of love, 
injustice, or such like, throw a shadow immeasurably far along his after years." — Jean 
Paul Richie r. 



"One thing I think must be clear : till man has learnt to feel for all his sentient fel- 
low creatures, whether in human or in brutal form, of his own class and sex and coun- 
try, or of another, he has not yet ascended the first step towards true civilization nor 
applied the first lesson from the love of God.* 1 — Miss Frances Power Cobbe. 



" He ( the child ) should be taught that knowledge is worthless if undirected by the 
benevolent virtues, that there is no being so insignificant as to be unworthy of his com- 
miseration and protection, be it the worm which crawls upon the ground, or the suffer- 
ing orphan, widow, or stranger.*' — Henry Bergh. 



"The humane instinct will assuredly continue to develop. And it should be ob~* 
served that to advocate the rights of animals is far more than to plead for compassion 
or justice towards the victims of ill-usage ; it is not only, and not primarily, for the sake 
of the victims that we plead, but for the sake of mankind itself. Our true civilization, 
our race-progress, our humanity ( in the best sense of the term ) are concerned in this 
development; it is ourselves, our own vital instincts that we wrong when we trample on 
the rights of the fellow-beings, human or animal, over whom we chance to hold jurisdic- 
tion. " — Henry S, Salt. 

(157) 



Ill M.\ x i: EDUCATION. 

"However Loftily the intellect of man may have been gifted, however skilfully it 
may have been trained, if it be not guided by a Bense of justice, a love of mankind, and 
a devotion to duty, its possessor is only a more splendid, a- he is a more dangerous bar- 
barian." — H<>ra<x Mann. 



"Thoughtless and unfeeling conduct, which rapidly develops into downright cruel- 
ty, is exercised first and most Largely toward the brute creation, because of its helpless- 
ness and the lamer opportunity. It may begin very early. An innocent baby will, in 
his exuberant happiness, squeeze a poor kitten nearly to death, and try to put his fin- 
gers into its eyes ; but the baby's innocence is no reason for allowing him a pastime 
which gives pain to a Living creature. The kitten has rights which even a baby can be 
taught to respect ; and the baby has the right to an early training which will make him, 
by and by, a benevolent and humane member of society, and not a selfish and thought- 
one." — Mrs, Mary F. Lovell. 



In an address on the means of inculcating the duty and pleasure of kindness and 
mercy, Mr. Geo. T. Angellsaid: — 

rt We have long ago found that the great remedy for all these wrongs lies, not in 
law and prosecuting officers, but in the public and private schools; that a thousand 
cases of cruelty can be prevented by kind words and humane education, for every one 
that can be prevented by prosecution; and that if we are ever going to accomplish any- 
thing of permanent value for the protection of those whom our Societies are organized 
to protect, it must be through the kind assistance of the teachers in our public and pri- 
vate schools. 

rf We found another important fact, that when children were taught to be kind to 
animals, to spare in springtime the mother-bird with its nest full of young, to pat the 
horses, and play with the dogs, and -peak kindly to all harmless living creatures, they 
become more kind, not only to animal.-, but also to each other." 1 



The object of Bands of Mercy is to encourage in every possible way brave, gen- 
erous, noble, and merciful deeds; to protect not only the dependent race-, but also every 
suffering human being that needs and deserve- protection. Mrs. M. I- Schaffter say- : 
"A Band of Mercy would so teach the children that they may become judicious philan- 
thropists, and the pledges merely demand justice and kindness to the fellow creature, 
whether it be an erring man, a suffering child, a dumb animal, or any living 
creature.'' .... 

(158) 



HUMANE EDUCATION. 

" Starting with the fact that all such reforms must begin with the children, because 
their hearts are tender, because they are impressionable, and because they indirectly 
educate their parents, a Band of Mercy might be justly termed a preparatory class for 
a Humane Society. In our public schools to-day are the men and women of our future; 
perhaps side by side may sit the future criminal and the judge, and just so surely as the 
insects under the seas are building the coral reefs, are the children of the present build- 
ing the future of our land, its moral and political government. Oh, the importance then 
of sowing the seeds of mercy and justice, of touching the hearts while tender, for the 
Lessons learned in early youth are the last to be forgotten; like the snatch of the song, 
they will come to mind, and often they govern our actions with an indefinable influence. 

"'The beginning is half of the whole/ as the old Greeks said. Touch a child's 
heart, make it to vibrate with the sufferings of another, make it to have sympathy, 
sympathy in its truest sense, a like suffering for every object of distress, and the 
child willingly goes to the rescue. Make the young to have pity for the beasts that 
suffer and are dumb, teach them of the uses that animals are to man, how blank and 
hard our lives would be without their service ; tell them how much we owe our friends 
in furs and feathers, and then we reach a higher work, the moral obligation of 
man as a superior animal to protect the weak and defenceless, and so we proceed until 
that highest sphere is reached — man's duty to man — but the task grows lighter, the 
corner stone has been laid, for the child who has learned to love and protect the dumb 
animals will never be cruel to a fellow human beino:." 1 



"This teaching 'kindness to animals ' may seem a very simple thing, but the more 
one looks into its merits, the more searching and penetrating does this spiritualizing 
influence prove to be, bringing about a real change of heart and of action, inspiring 
love, justice, and compassion in the place of thoughtless selfishness and heedless cruelty ; 
training the mind to apprehend and the heart to sympathize with the claims and needs of the 
lowly creatures who form the theoretical object lesson which proves of unfailing interest to 
the children, and it is not difficult to see how the 'protecting sympathy ' which a child 
may be taught to feel toward its helpless dumb companion may become in after years the 
noble, altruistic sentiment which animates the life of the philanthropist." — G. Kendall. 



METHODS. 



QUOTATION FROM .MR. DE SAILLY. 

Mr. de Sailly, the eminent French teacher, said: — ff I have long been convinced 
that kindness to animals is productive of great results, and that it is not only the most 

(159) 



// UMA NE EDUCATION. 

powerfnl cause of material prosperity , but also the beginning of moral perfection. . . 

" M \ method of teaching kindness to animals has the advantage of in noway In- 
terfering with the regular routine of my school. Two day- in the week all our lessons 
arc conducted with reference to this subject. For instance, in the reading class, 1 choose 
a book upon animals, and always find time for useful instruction and good advice. 
My ( copies ' for writing are facts in natural history, and impress upon the pupils ideas 
of justice and kindness towards useful animals. 

" In written exercises, in spelling and composition, I teach the good care which 
should be taken of domestic animals, and the kindness which should be shown them. 
I prove thai by not overworking them, and by keeping them in clean and roomy stables, 
feeding them well, and treating them kindly and gently, a greater profit and larger crops 
may be obtained than by abusing them. I also speak, in this connection, of certain 
small animals which, although in a wild state, are very useful to farmers. 

"The results of my instruction have been, and are, exceedingly satisfactory. 
My ideas have deeply impressed my pupils, and have exercised the best influence upon 
their lives and characters. Ever since I introduced the subject into my school I have 
found the children less disorderly, and more gentle and affectionate towards each other. 
They feel more and more kindly towards animals, and have entirely given up the cruel 
practice of robbing nests and killing small birds. They are touched by the suffering 
and misery of animals, and the pain which they feel when they see them cruelly used 
has been the means of exciting other persons to pity and compassion.' 1 



WHAT HAS BEEN DONE IN THE UNITED STATES AND IN ENGLAND. 

In the States of Maine and Washington, there are laws which require the teaching 
of kindness to animals. In Washington, the law reads as follows: — 

"No less than ten minutes each week must be devoted to systematic teaching of 
kindness to not only our domestic animals, but to all living creatures." 

This is the law in Maine : — 

"And it also shall be the duty of all teachers in the public schools of this State to 
devote not less than ten minutes of each week of the school-term to teaching to the chil- 
dren under their charge, the principles of kindness to birds and animals.' 1 

In Oil City, Pa., Mr. C. A. Babcock, Superintendent of Schools, has inaugurated 
an annual Bird Day on the first Friday in May, in which essays, poems, observa- 
tions of pupils and interesting facts concerning the habits, uses, and peculiarities of 
birds shall be presented in public exercises. 

The object is to increase the study of Nature, to develop habits of observation, and 
to cultivate kindness to our feathered friends, without which insects would destroy our 
fruits and grains and lender man's existence on earth precarious if not impossible. 

(160) 



HUMANE EDUCATION* 

"It is to be hoped that Bird Day may be observed in all the schools of this na- 
tion.'* — Journal of Education. 

In Providence, R. I., Hon. II. S. Tarbell, L.L.D., Superintendent of Schools, has 
sent a letter to the teachers, suggesting the desirability of teaching kindness to animals 
by short talks and readings by the teachers, with humane essays by the pupils and 
reports of their observations of birds and animals. He suggests also that Bands of 
Mercy be organized. 

In Birmingham, England, the plan of teaching kindness to animals was adopted 
in the Board Schools about eighteen }*ears ago, and it still continues with very satisfac- 
tory results. This teaching has also been adopted in other places, among which are 
Bristol, Brighton, and Coventry. 

76,617 Humane Essays were written in the sixty -five hundred schools of London 
in 1893, for which twelve hundred prizes were distributed by her Royal Highness the 
Duchess of Fife at the Crystal Palace on June 2, 1894. 



BA^DS OF MERCY. 




Founders of American Band of Mercy.— Geo. T. Angell and Rev. Thomas Timmins. 
Prominent Members in the Bands of Mercy in America. 

Archbishops and Bishops in the Roman Catholic and Episcopal churches, eminent 
clergymen in the various denominations, chancellors, presidents, and professors connected 
with our leading universities and colleges, state, city, and country superintendents of 
schools, teachers in the public schools, governors, judges, eminent lawyers and physi- 
cians, wealthy business men. bankers, editors, statesmen, generals, and others are 
enrolled among their membership. 

Over twenty-seven thousand branches of the Parent American Band of Mercy have 
been formed, with probably over eight hundred thousand members. 

(161) 



//n/.i \i: EDUCATI01T. 
BAND OF MERCY PLEDGE. 

*1 WILL THY TO BE KIM) TO A 1.1. LIVING I REAT1 BE8, \M> WILL TBI TO PBOTE< I 

THEM FROM I 1:1 11.1- \.,i .." 

K What is the object of the Bands of MercyP" [answer: "To teach every child 

and older person to seize every opportunity to say a kind word or do a kind act that will 
make some other human being or dumb creature, happier. . . 

" In a large Scottish public school at Edinburgh, out of about seven thousand pupils 
carefully taughl kindness to the lower animals, it was found that not one had ever 
been charged with a criminal offence in any court. 

"Out of two thousand criminals inquired of in American prisons, some years ago, 
it was found that only twelve had any pel animal during their childhood. 

"Edward Everett Hale says: 'We are all in tin; same boat, both animal- ami 
men. You cannot promote kindness to 0m 1 without benefiting tin; other. 1 

" Is there 1 anything which strikes more directly at the roots of wars, riots, anarchy. 
and every form of cruelty, than humane education of the children in all our public, pri- 
vate, and Sunday schools ? 

"Please think and tell me if you can find a better way under heaven for making 
children merciful than by teaching them to be constantly doing kind acts and Baying 
kind words to (Jod's lower creatures, by whom they are surrounded, and which they are 
meeting on the streets and elsewhere a hundred times a day? 

" I believe there is a great defect in our systems of education. I believe that in 
our public schools it is quite as possible to develop the heart as the intellect, and that 
when this is required and done, we shall not only have higher protection for dumb crea- 
tures, and so increased length of human life, but also human life better developed and 
better worth living. 1 believe that the future student of American history will wonder 
that in the public schools of a free government, whose very existence depended upon 
public integrity and morals, so /////<■// attention should have been paid t<> the cultivation of 
tin inlelh >■/, a, ui so little in the cultivation of the heart. 

"Is H not largely, if not wholly, a question of education^ 

"I am sometimes asked, 'Why do you spend so much of your time and money in 
talking about kindness to animals, when there is so much cruelty to men?' and I an- 
swer, ' / '//// working at tht /■<»>/>.' Every humane publication, every lecture, every step 
in doing or teaching kindness to them, i- a step to prevent crime, — a step in promoting 
the growth of those qualities of heart which will elevate human souls, even in the dens 
of sin and shame, and prepare the way for the coming of peace on earth and good will 
to men. 

"Standing before you a- the advocate of the lower races, I declare what I believe 

(168) 



HUMANE EDUCATION. 

cannot be gain-said — thai jnsl bo soon and bo far as we pour into all our schools the songs, 
poems, and literature of mercy towards these lower creatures, just so soon and so far sh< til 
the roots not only of cruelty ', but of crime." — George T. Angell. 

BANDS OF MERCY IX SCHOOLS. 

The opportunities of a teacher to educate in humanity are very great. It is a sim- 
ple matter to form a Band of Mercy. The children should sign the pledge, choose a 
name, and elect a 1 'resident and Secretary. It is well that the teacher should be Presi- 
dent. It need take but a few minutes of each week for the scholars to repeat together 
the pledge. A time for exercises of a miscellaneous character, meant to be in part a 
recreation, is set apart in most schools. This time can occasionally be used for the Band 
of Mercy, and thus avoid hindrance to regular study. Reading lessons, etc., will give 
the interested teacher many opportunities for reminders between the regular meetings. 
Many teachers will gladly use Black Beauty as supplementary reading, and the 
children are sure to like it. Memory gems from standard authors are very useful. 

In connection with school work, it is suggested that the children should write com- 
positions on the subject of kindness to animals and to human beings. With wise help from 
the teachers, much good may result from this exercise, and it will aid in keeping up the 
interest. 

Good pictures of animals and flowers should be hung on the walls of school rooms. 

Apart from schools, any intelligent boy or girl can form a Band of Mercy without cost. 
Nothing is required to be a member but to sign the pledge or authorize it to be signed. 

The Band can be composed entirely of children, or of children and older persons. 

There should be a President and Secretary chosen, also a name for the Band. 

As Boon as the Band numbers thirty members, report should be made to Mr. Geo. 
T. Angell, President of the American Humane Education Society, 19 Milk Street, 
Boston, Mass. 

Mr. Angell offers to send for one year to Bands of Mercy of that size that are 
formed anywhere, whether in schools or by individuals, a copy of " Our Dumb Animals," 
a monthly paper full of interesting stories and pictures ; also a variety of leaflets and a 
badge. 

A Good Order ok Exer< [SES for Bands ok Mercy Meetings. 

1. Sing Band of Mercy song and repeat pledge together. 

2. Remarks by President, and reading of report of last meeting by Secretary. 

:'>. Readings, recitations, "memory gems, 11 and anecdotes of good and noble sayings, 
ami also of kind acts performed to help both human and dumb creatures. 

(163) 



HUM A NE ED UCA TION. 

4. Sing Band of Mercy song. 
A brief address. 

6. Enrollment of new members, 

7. Sing Band of Mercy Bong. 

Subjects for Composition. 

The Rights of Animals and the Protection that we should give them. 

Transportation of Cattle, or Journey from the Western Plains to the Market. 

How does Cruelty to Animals affeel Meat. Milk, and Fish? 

Influence of Humane Education. 

Importance of Early Lessons in Kindness. 

Some Account of the Humane Work done by Henry Bergh. 

Some Account of the Humane Work done by Geo. T. Angell. 

Cruelty to Horses : Check-rein, Blinders. Docking. 

Various Ways in which the Tight (heck-rein affects the Horse. 

Lessons learned from BLACK BEAUTY. 

Acts of Kindness which I have observed. 

The Bights of Cats. 

The Cruelty of Abandoning Cats when moving from One House to Another 

Good Work done by Frogs and Toads. 

The Value of Bird Life, and How Birds Help the Farmer. 

How shall we protect the Birds? 

What Trees should be planted to attract the Birds to our Farms, and what Wild 
Fruit Trees would they prefer to the Cultivated Fruit Trees ? 

Egret Plumes and how they are obtained. 

Cruelty of keeping Caged Birds and confining Wild Animals. 

The Pleasure of observing closely the Habits of Animals and Birds. 

Examples of Animal Intelligence. 

Will Children taught to be kind to All Creatures and thoughtful of Each Others 1 
Welfare be Better Men and Women as a Result of Such Teaching? 

Reproduction of Stories about Animals read to the Younger Children by the Teachers. 

List of Publications. 

From Mr. Geo. T. Angell, 19 Milk St., Boston. Mass., Valuable leaflets and book- 
may be obtained; among others, the interesting story of a horse, called Lb \< B 
Beat rv. by Anna Sewell, which ha- been translated into many different Ian -in 
Several hundred thousand copies of this book have been sold. It has been used as 
a supplementary reader in public schools, and is recommended for that purpose by 

(164) 



HUM AXE EDUCATION. 

Dr. Wni. T. Hams, Commissioner of Education, U. S. A. Price, paper bound, 10 cts., 
postage paid. 

•• in and Our Friends" price 5 cts., and other leaflets, maybe obtained of Mrs. 
Mary F. Loyell, Box 168, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

An assortment of leaflets and pamphlets suitable for use in schools and for distribu- 
tion elsewhere, including some with stories of cats, dogs, etc., can be obtained from the 
Humane Education Committee, 61 Westminster St., Providence, R. I. Price 25 
cents in stamps for assortment of leaflets, postage paid. 

Information in regard to good and inexpensive pictures for school rooms will be 
given on application. 

At the same address may also be obtained : — 

Animals" Rights, by H. S. Salt, suitable for teachers for reference, but not 
adapted to the use of children. Price 40 cents, postage paid. 

Voices for the Speechless, a collection of poems from standard authors, suit- 
able for recitations, etc. Price 40 cents, postage paid. 

Extermination of Birds. Price 10 cents. 

Send postage stamp for price list of publications. 

Other humane literature may be obtained as follows : — 

Aims and Objects of the Toronto Humane Society, published by the 
Toronto Humane Society, 103 Bay St., Toronto, Canada. Price 25 cents. This 
book contains many interesting selections and is suitable for the use of teachers. 

The Humane Educator and Reciter, a large collection of poems and prose 
selections, suitable for recitations, published by Simpkin, Marshall, Hamilton, 
Kent & Co., London, England. Price $1.05, postage paid. 



(165) 



OVTLIXK OF BAND Of .>/;'■./.< V E \ I i: I; 1 Al A M t-..\ I . 



OTJTLIXE OF BAND OF MERCY ENTER- 
TAINMENT. 

Note. This is intended simply as an outline and suggestion for a Rand of Mercy entertainment. 
There are inure selections in it than could with advantage be used at any our time, and different Bongs 

can be used at different times from the Bong-Book. Each section is numbered so that the teacher or 
president of the Rami of Mercy may select such numbers as she prefers, and so regulate tin- length of 

the entertainment. Those who are to take part should be furnished with a slip of paper on which the 
numbers of the recitations or songs are given, in order that there may be no awkward pause in the 
program. The selections may be used either for reading or recitation as the president may think best. 
There are many poems in the book which are suitable for readings and recitations, such as "The Spar- 
rows, 1 "The Wounded Curlew." and others by Celia Thaxter; "April Song," by Mary E. Wilkins; "The 
Brown Thrush," by Lucy Larcom ; "Robertof Lincoln," byW.C. Bryant; "True Freedom," and "The 
Fatherland," by James Russell Lowell, etc. 

SUBJECT:— KINDNESS TO ANIMALS. 

1. Music. 

"The Morning Light is Breaking,"* page 143. 

2. "Anions the noblest in the land, 
Though he may count himself the least, 
That man I honor and revere 

Who without favor, without fear, 

In the groat city dares to stand. 

The friend of every friendless beast." 

—Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. 
3. 

"Sweet mercy is nobility's true badge." 

— William 8hakespt an . 
4. 

" Birds and beasts, 
And the mute fish that glances in the stream, 
And harmless reptile, coiling in the sun, 
And gorgeous insect, hovering in the air, 
The fowl domestic, and the household dog, 
In his capaciousmind he loved them all. 
Their rights acknowledging, he felt for all; 

Rich in love 
And sweet humanity, he was, himself. 
To the degree that he desired, beloved." 

— Extract from Wordsworth's The Excursion.' 1 

•All the music referred to in this program is taken from the first part of this hook. 

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5. 
"The bravest are ever the most humane, the most gentle, the most kind; and if 
any one would be truly brave, lei him learn to be gentle and tender to every one and 
everything* about him." — Rev. Arthur Si VOi U, M.A. 

6. "O it is excellent 

To have a giant's strength, but it is tyrannous 
To use it like a giant." — Shakespeare. 
7. 
"If all the birds should die, not a human being could live on the earth, for the in- 
sects on which the birds live would increase so enormously as to destroy all vegetation. 11 

— Mi<' lul< I. 
8. 
Prof. E. E. Fish estimates that birds save, for agricultural purposes alone, 
annually, one hundred million dollars in the United States, and we are told that insect 
life in many places has increased so as to make human life almost unendurable. 

9. EXTKACT FROM THE " BlRDS OF KILLING WOKTH." 

"Think, every morning when the sun peeps through 

The dim, leaf -latticed windows of the grove, 
How jubilant the happy birds renew 

Their old melodious madrigals of love ! 
And when you think of this, remember, too, 

'Tis always morning somewhere, and above 
The awakening continents, from shore to shore, 
Somewhere the birds are singing evermore. 

Think of your woods and orchards without birds! 
Of empty nests that cling to boughs and beams, 



Will bleat of flocks or bellowing of herds 

Make up for the lost music, when your teams 
Drag home the stingy harvest, and no more 
The feathered gleaners follow to your door ? 



You call them thieves and pillagers ; but know 

They are the winged wardens of your farms, 
Who from the cornfields drive the insidious foe, 

And fro'm your harvest keep a hundred harms. 
Even the blackest of them all, the crow. 

Renders good service as your man-at-arms, 
Crushing the beetle in his coat-of-mail, 
And crying havoc on the slug and snail." 

—Henry Wadeworth Longfellow. 
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10. Music. 

••A Finished Nest, 11 page 103; or ••hunt Kill the Birds, 11 page 89; or any other 
song about birds. 

11. Araks \m> Turn; Horses. 

The Arabs aever use whips to their horses. The horses are generally not tied, 
but they never stray from their master's tent. They even go into the tenl and lie down 
there, treading cautiously till they reach their own place. 

12. 

II. W. Herbert, in his "Hints to Horse Keepers," says: "The check, or bearing- 
rein, is an unaccountable mistake in harness invention. AVhile it holds the horses head 
in an unnatural, ungraceful, and uncomfortable position, it gives the mouth a callous, 
horny character, and entirely destroys all chance for line driving. 

"Over live hundred veterinary surgeons have signed a petition condemning the 
tight check-rein as painful to hor>e< and productive of disease. 11 

13. Thoughtlessness. 

"Yes, I believe that it is thoughtlessness that underlies tin 1 brutalities of the pleasure- 
seeker which, intheir aggregate, are greaterthan the brutalitiesof the battle-field. Think 
of the fox-hunting, deer-stalking, pigeon-shooting, and the horse-racing atrocities. 
Think of the cruel suffering perpetrated by the fashionable woman who drives her horse 
mutilated in the tail and tortured into the most unnatural position with that contrivance 
worthy the Spanish inquisition — the over-check. Is it thoughtlessness? But thought- 
lessness is so selfish, and selfishness is sin, and it will never vanish until religion rebukes 
and redeems the soul into tlloug•htfulness.* , — Jcnkin Lloyd Jones. 

14. Music. 

"The Arab's Farewell to his Favorite Steed." page 52; or "Dare to do Right, 11 
page 24. 

15. 

Do not chain up your dog, but give him freedom to exercise as Ins nature demands. 
His entire physical being is framed for activity, and he suffers greatly if kept chained up : 
moreover, there is danger of his becoming ill, and perhaps rabid. He will not be 
nearly so likely to run away if you treat him well. 

It is well known that even a good natureddog will be made cross and dangerous by 
being chained up. An ugly dog, who cannot be trusted to run loose, had belter be hu- 
manely disposed of than kept to suffer. Remember that these household friends depend 
upon you for their haj »pi: 

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Chained. 



'Twas only a dog in a kennel, 

And little the noise lie made, 
But it seemed to me as I heard it, 

I knew what the old dog said: 

"Another long day to get over, 
Will nohody loosen my chain, 

Just for a run round the meadow, 
Then fasten me up again? 

" What's left in my trough is all stagnant, 
Matted with tufts of hair ; 



My kennel is littered and filthy — 
I'd rather my kennel was bare. 

"Bones? Why I heartily loath them! 

Nothing but bones and meat ! 
Till I hate my existence and envy 

The dogs that starve in the street. 

"Give me my old life of freedom ! 

Give me a plunge and a swim ! 
A dash and a dive in the river, 

A shake and a splash in the brim." 



The Baby's Guardian. 

A gentleman in Connecticut took not long ago a collie from the Lothian Kennels at 
Stepney. The dog, after the fashion of its kind, soon made himself one of the family , 
and assumed especial responsibilities in connection with the youngest child, a girl, 
three years of age. It happened one day in November that the father was returning from 
a drive, and as he neared his house he noticed the dog in a pasture which was separated 
by a stone wall from the road. From behind this wall the collie would spring up, bark, 
and then jump down again, constantly repeating it. Leaving his horse and going to the 
spot he found his little girl seated on a stone, with the collie wagging his tail and keeping 
guard beside her. In the light snow their path could be plainly seen and as he traced 
it back he saw where the little one had walked several times round an open well in the 
pasture. Very close to the brink were the prints of the baby's shoes, but still closer on 
the edge of the well were the tracks of the collie Avho had evidently kept between her 
and the well. I need not tell you of the feeling of the father as he saw T the fidelity of the 
dumb creature, walking between the child and what might otherwise have been a terrible 
death. — From "Our Dumb Animals.''' 1 



16. Music. 

"Loving Kindness to All," page 36. 

17. One Woman in England. 

Some years ago, in a foreign city, horses were continually slipping on the smooth 
and icy pavement of a steep hill, up which loaded wagons and carts were constantly 
moving. Yet no one seemed to think of any better remedy than to beat and curse the 
animals who tugged and pulled and slipped on the hard stones. 

No one thought of a better way, except a poor old woman, who lived at the foot of 

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the hill, [t hurt her so, to see the poor horses slip and fall on the Blippery pavement, 
that every morning, old and feeble a- she was, with trembling steps Bhe climbed the lull 
and emptied her ash-pan, and such ashes as Bhe could collect from her neighbors, od the 
smoothest Bpot. 

At firsl the teamsters paid her very little attention, bul after a little they began to 
look for her. to appreciate her kindness, to he ashamed of their own cruelty, and to Listen 
to her requests, that they would he inure gentle with their beasts. 

The town officials heard of the old Lady's work and they were ashamed too, ami >et 
to work Levelling the hill and re-opening the pavement. Prominent men came to know 
what the old woman had done, ami it suggested t<> them an organization fordoing BUCh 
work as the old lady had inaugurated. All this made the teamsters so grateful, thai they 
went among their employers and others with a subscription paper, and raised a fund 
which bought the old lady a comfortable annuity for life. So one poor old woman and 
her ash-pan not only kept the poor overloaded horses from falling, and stopped tin; blows 
and curses of their drivers, lint made every animal in the city more comfortable, im- 
proved and beautified the city itself, aud excited an epoch of good feeling and kindness, 
the end of which no one can tell. — Rev. F. M. Todd, Manassas, Virginia. 

18. Music. "Little Gustava," by Celia Thaxter, page 39. 

19. About Cats. 

Dr. W . (Jordon Stables, who has written a book about cats, in speaking of a cats 
devotion to her kittens, says: " In no case is her wisdom and sagacity better exhibited 
than in the love and care she displays for her offspring. . . . Cats will go through 
fire and water to save the life of their kittens, and fight to the hitter end to protect them." 

He gives instances of cats saving their kittens from drowning, and other stories in 
illustration of this affection. The following passages are quoted from his hook: — 

(t Are cats more attached to places than to persons? ... I am happy to find 
that the opinion of all cat lovers, nearly all cat breeders, and the lame majority of peo- 
ple who keep a cat for utility, is that cats are as a rule more attached to their masters 01 
owners than to their homes. . , , The popular fallacy that cats are fonder of places 

than persons firsl took its origin in the days. Long gone by, when cats were kept for use 
only and never as pets; and it only obtains now among people who look upon pussj as 
a mere animated rat-trap. 

"'My own cat,' writes a Lady correspondent, 'although greatly petted by its master, 
appear- <|uite wretched whenever I go on a visit. After mewing piteously at my door 

for a day or two, he leaves the house, often remaining away lor weeks; hut his delight 

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at seeing me, the fond rush towards me, and his song of joy are very pretty. 1 . . . 
I know an instance of a cat that was very strongly attached to a boy. When this boy was 
sent to a distant school, pussy, after mourning for him several days, took to the woods 
and never returned.* 1 

In even city we often see poor, half-starved, gaunt, wild-looking cats that have 
been thrust out to care for themselves when their owners left the neighborhood or city. 
Many of these have been pets and loved companions in good homes. 

Lot every humane person consider the condition of these homeless cats, without 
shelter, liable to be stoned by cruel boys or hurt by dogs, suffering for want of food and 
water, and suffering too, far more than is generally supposed, from want of the compan- 
ionship and affection to which they have been accustomed. 

It does not seem possible that any one can be guilty of such deliberate euelty, — to 
take into one's home and pet and care for an animal and then abandon it to starvation 
and misery ! 

If a good home cannot be provided it is far kinder to have the cat humanely disposed 
of, and in many places, a Humane Society will either attend to this if notified, or give 
directions as to the best method. 

20. 
"The Kitten and the Falling Leaves. 1 ' — Wordsworth. 

21. Music. "The Grey Kitten, 11 page 68. 

22. An Incident Related by Miss Louisa M. Alcott. 

" Somewhere above Fitchburg, as we stopped for twenty minutes at a station, I 
amused myself by looking out of a window at a waterfall which came tumbling over 
the rocks, and spread into a wide pool that flowed up to the railway. Close by stood a 
cattle-train, and the mournful sounds that came from it touched my heart. 

"Full in the hot sun stood the cars, and every crevice of room between the bars 
across the doorways was filled with pathetic noses, sniffing eagerly at the sultry gusts 
that blew by, with now and then a fresher breath from the pool that lay dimpling before 
them. How they must have suffered, in sight of water, with the cool dash of the fall 
tantalizing them, and not a drop to wet their poor parched mouths! 

"The cattle lowed dismally, and the sheep tumbled one over the other, in their 
frantic attempts to reach the blessed air, bleating bo plaintively the while, that I was 
tempted to get out and see what I could do for them. But the time was nearly up, and, 
while I hesitated, two little girls appeared, and did the kind deed better than I could 
have done it. 

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OUTLINE OF BAND OF MERCY ENTERTAINMENT. 

"I could not hear what they said, but as they worked away so heartily, their little 
tanned fare- grew lovely to me, in spite of their old hats, their bare feet, and their shab- 
by gowns. One pulled off her apron, spread it on the grass, and emptying upon it the 
berries from her pail, ran to the pool and returned with it dripping, to hold it up to the 
Buffering sheep, who stretched their hot tongues gratefully to meet it, and lapped the 
precious water with an eagerness that made little barefoot's task a hard one. 

"But to and fro she ran. never tired, though the small pail was so soon empty, 
and her friend meanwhile pulled great handfuls of clover and grass for the cows, and 
having no pail, filled her 'picking-dish 1 with water to throw on the poor dusty noses 
appealing to her through the bars. T wish I could have told those tender-hearted chil- 
dren how beautiful their compassion made that hot. noisy place, and what a sweet 
picture I took away with me of those two little sisters of charity." 



23. Egret Plumes. 

The Egret Plumes so universally worn on ladies' bonnets are taken from a bird 
called the Egret or Snowy Heron. These plumes grow on the birds during the breeding 
season when their extreme love for their young makes them an easy prey for the hunter, 
when they are shot down by thousands a- they always nest in some secluded part of the 
forest. 

Those who have heard them, say that the cries of the young birds are perfectly 
heartrending, as they are left to starve in the nests. Who can wear egret plumes after 
learning these facts? When women refuse to buy them, the birds will no longer be 
killed, as there will be no demand for them. 



24. Music. "The Caged Bird's Lament, 1 ' page 98; or "The Brown Thrush,' 
page 104. 

25. The Frkjiitexed Birds. 

" Hush ! hush ! " said the little brown thrush, 

To her mate on the nest in the alder-bush; 

"Keep still! don't open your bill, 

There's a boy coming bird-nesting over the hill. 

Let «o your wings out, so 

That not an egg or the nest shall show. 

Chee! chee! it seems to me 

I'm as frightened as ever a bird can be. 

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OUTLINE OF BAND OF MERCY ENTERTAINMENT. 

" Then still, with a quivering bill, 

They watched the boy out of sight o'er the hill, 

Ah, then, in the branches again, 

Their glad song rang over vale and glen. 

Oh ! oh ! if that boy could know 

How glad they were they saw him go, 

Say, say do you think next day 

He could possibly steal those eggs away ?" — Anon. 

26. Various Noted Men and Their Love of Animals. 

It would take a long time to tell of the happiness that is added to human lives by 
love for the lower creatures. No man can measure the happiness which came into the 
lives of such men as Sir W alter Scott and Sir Edwin Landseer through their love of 
dogs ; or into the lives of Cardinal Wolsey and Cardinal Richelieu through their love of 
cats ; or into the life of Daniel Webster from his love of cattle. Just before he died at 
Marshfield, when he found he was about to die, he requested that all his cattle should be 
driven to his window that he might see them for the last time; and as they came, one 
by one, to his window, he called each by name. Ernest von Vogelweide, the great 
lyric poet of the Middle Ages, so loved the birds that he left a large bequest to the 
monks of Wurtzburg on condition that they should feed the birds every day on the 
tomb-stone over his grave. 

27. How Some Great Men Have Shown Kindness to Animals. 

Lincoln. 

In the early pioneer days, when Abraham Lincoln w r as a practising attorney and "rode 
the circuit " as was the custom at that time, he made one of a party of horsemen, lawyers 
like himself , who were on their way one spring morning from one court town to another. 
Their course w r as across the prairies and through the timber ; and as they passed by a 
little grove, wdiere the birds were singing merrily, they noticed a little fledgeling which 
had fallen from the nest and was fluttering by the roadside. After they had ridden a 
short distance, Mr. Lincoln stopped and, wheeling his horse, said, "Wait for me a mo- 
ment, I will soon rejoin you; 1 ' and as the party halted and w T atched him they saw Mr. 
Lincoln return to the place where the little bird lay helpless on the ground, saw him 
tenderly take it up and set it carefully on a limb near the nest. When he joined his 
companions, one of them laughingly said, "Why, Lincoln, what did you bother your- 
self and delay us for, with such a trifle as that?" The reply deserves to be remembered. 
"My friend." said Lincoln, "I can only say this, that I feel better for it. 11 Is there 
not a world of suggestion in that rejoinder? 

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28. St. 1"i; \\< L8 OF Assisi. 

Amoog8t the many beautiful Btories told <»f St. Francis ot Assisi, none are more 
beautiful and striking than those concerning his love for, and tenderness towards, an- 
imals. How he loved the birds, and called them his Bisters; how they used to come to 

him whilst he spoke to them and blessed them: how he saved a pigeon from the hands of 
a hoy who was going to kill it — how he -poke of it as an emblem of innocence and 
purity, and made a Qesl for it and watched over it and its young ones: how he had pity 
on a poor wolf, and tamed it and caused it to follow him; and also how he thought of 

the fishes, and blessed them. 

29. Geoi;<;k Stephenson. 

George Stephenson went one day into an upper room of his house and closed the 
window. Two or three days afterwards, however, he chanced to observe a bird flying 
against that same window, and beating against it with all its might, again and again, :i- 
if trying to break it. His sympathy and curiosity were aroused. What could the little 
thing want? He at once went to the room and opened the window and the bird flew 
straight to one particular spot where Stephenson saw a nest — that little bird- nest. 
The poor bird looked at it. took the sad story in at a glance, and fluttered down to the 
th>or. broken hearted, almost dead. 

Stephenson, drawing near to look, found the mother bird, and under it four tiny little 
ones — mother and. young all apparently dead. He tenderly lifted the exhausted bird 
from the floor, the worm it had so long and bravely struggled to bring to its home and 
young still in its beak, and carefully tried to revive it; but all his efforts proved in vain. 
At that time the force of George Stephenson's mind was changing the face of the earth: 
yet he wept at the sight of this dead family and was deeply grieved because he himself 
had unconsciously been the cause of death. 

30. Music. "Heimdall," page 22. 

31. A.GAS8IZ. 

The great Swiss-American Naturalist always taught his pupils to kill fish as Boon 
as Caught, by a blow on the back of the head, that they might not suffer before dying. 

32. George II. Corliss. 

When Mr. Ceorge TI. Corliss, the famous engine builder of Providence, R. I., was 
building a foundry at the Corliss work-, some blue birds took the opportunity to build in 

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some holes in the interior framework into which timbers ( horizontal ) were to go. The 
birds flew in and out — as bluebirds will — and went on with their housekeeping, until 
in the natural course of things the workmen would have evicted them to put the apertures 
to their iutended use of receiving timbers. But Mr. Corliss interfered and showed how 
tin 1 particular aperture the birds were occupying could be left undisturbed until they 
were done with it, without any serious delay to the building. So the pair came and went 
in the midst of the noise of building and brought up their little family safely, and after 
they had flown away, and not until then, that particular part of the framework was 
completed. 

At another time, Mr. Corliss was working on a contract with the city of Providence 
to supply a steam-pumping apparatus, power-house and all, at Sockonosset, and the 
time was short, and there were forfeitures nominated in the bond for every day beyond 
a specified date for its completion. 

The power-house was to be upon virgin soil where were rocks and trees — little 
trees growing among rocks. In blasting and clearing the necessary place for the 
foundations of the building, a robin's nest was discovered in a little tree within the space 
where the upheavals were to be made. When Mr. Corliss knew this he had the work 
transferred to the other side of the square or parellelogram around which the digging 
and blasting was to go, saying that it was just as well to do the other side first. 

But it proved that when the workmen had gotten clear around and back to the robin's 
tree, the young birds were still not quite ready to fry. This called for a new exercise of 
an inventor's power of adapting means to a worthy end. Looking at the little tree with 
its nesl and little birds high in the branches he bade the men support the tree carefully 
while it was sawed through the trunk a little above the ground, and then carry it in an 
upright position to a safe distance and stick it into the ground with proper support. 

The robin family continued to thrive after this novel house-moving and all flew 
away together after a few more days. 

34. George Herbert. 

George Herbert when dressed for a musical party in Salisbury, met on the road 
an overloaded and fallen horse. He at once proceded to help the carter unload and 
rescue the horse, departing with the injunction, that if he "loved himself he should be 
merciful to his beast." " For," said Herbert afterwards, if I be bound to pray for all in 
distress. I am sure that I am bound to practise what T pray for. I would not willingly 
pa-- <>n«' day of my life without comforting a sad soul or showing mercy.'" 

Thus he left the poor man ; and at his coming to his musical friends at Salisbury, 
they began to wonder that Mr. George Herbert, who used to be so trim and clean, came 
into that company so soiled and discomposed ; but he told them the occasion. And 

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when one oi the company told him "he had disparaged himself by bo dirty an employ- 
ment, 11 hia answer was: "That the thought of whal he had done would prove music to 
him at midnight : and that the omission of it would have upbraided and mad.- discord in 
his conscience, whensoever he should pass by that place. 11 

34. Music. w Ring the Bella of Mercy, 11 page SI. 

35. rf Beautiful lives are those that bless 
Silent rivers of happiness 

Whose hidden fountains, but few may guess."— CoU ridgi ■ 
36. 
" Evil is wrought by want of thought as well as want of heart." — Thomas Hood. 

37. 
What Some Great Men and Women save said about Kindness to Animals. 

38. " The quality of mercy is not strained ; 
Itdroppeth as the gentle rain from heaven 
Upon the place beneath: it is twice bless'd ; 

It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes: 

'Tis mightiest in the mightest ; it becomes 

The throned monarch better than his crown."— Shakespeare. 

39. " I would not enter on my list of friends 

(Though graced with polished manners and tine sense, 

Yet wanting sensibility,) the man 

Who needlessly sets foot upon a worm." — Will 'mm Con- per. 

40. n One lesson, Shepherd, let us two divide, 
Taught both by what He shows, and what conceals, 
Never to blend our pleasure or our pride 

With sorrow of the meanest thing that feels." — William Wordsworth. 

41. 

"I can say I have never killed a bird. I would not crush the meanest insect that 
crawls upon the ground. They have the same right to life that I have, they receive it 
from the same Father, and I will not mar the works of God by wanton cruelty." 

— WilUtnii Ellery ('//"in/in;/. 
4'2. 

"The domestic animal- are very silent about (the ill-treatnieiit which they receive). 
They make little complaint. The shaved horse which is left standing uncovered in the 
icy blast until he quakes with bitter cold, hut still stands unflinching ; or the same hap- 
less animal whose tail is bobbed so that every summer insect can sting him at will 

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OUTLINE OF BAND OF MERCY ENTERTAINMENT. 

unharmed, bat which neither; kicks nor runs : the dog whose ears and tail are eul and 
clipped to please the fancy or further the plans of his human owner, and which is teased 
and whipped and outraged under the plea of training — would they necessarily dilate 
seductively to their comrades, still doubting and delaying in the forest, upon the chances 
and advantages of human intercourse. Do they not, indeed, appeal mutely to intelligent 
human beings to consider carefully whether civilized man is yet civilized enough to be 
intrusted with the happiness and training and fate of animals?" 

— Qeorgt William Curtis. 

43. 

"There is cruelty enough in my own country, but our gentle-women do not at 
present think of beautifying themselves with dead birds. God bless you and your 
humane work." — Pundita Ramabai. 



44. " I detect 

More good than evil in humanity. 

Love lights more fires than hate extinguishes, 

And men grow better as the world grows old." 

— Oliver Wendell Holmes. 

45. Forbearance. 

"Hast thou named all the birds without a gun? 

Loved the wood-rose and left it on the stalk ? 

At rich men's tables eaten bread and pulse? 

Unarmed, faced danger with a heart of trust? 

And loved so well a high behavior, 

In man or maid, that thou from speech refrained. 

Nobility more nobly to repay? 

Oh! be my friend, and teach me to be thine!" 

— Ralph Waldo Emerson. 

46. Music. n True Freedom,'' page 144 ; or "He Liveth Long Who Liveth Well," 
page 81. 



47. Music. "Closing Hymn." 



(BY A CLASS OF LITTLE CHILDREN.) 

" He prayeth best who loveth best 
All things both great and small ; 
For the dear God who loveth us, 
He made and loveth all." 

— From Samuel Taylor Coleridge. 

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OUTLINE OF BAND OF MERCY ENTERTAINMENT. 

There are a number of poems by standard authors which could be used at such en- 
tertainments. The following arc a few which are suggested ■ — - 

Edmund Spenser. The Butterfly. 

ALEXAXDEB Pope. Instruction from Animated Nature. 

William Cowper. The Happiness of Animals. 

Robert Burns. To a Field Mouse ; On Scaring Some Waterfowl. 

William Wordsworth. The Lost Traveller ; To a Butterfly ; To the Sky-lark ; The 
Kitten and the Falling L«:i\ es. 

Sib Walter Scott. The Wren. 

Percy Bysshe Shelley. To a Skylark; To a Young Ass. 

Samuel Tayxob Coleridge. To a Young Ass; Selections from the Ancient Mariner. 

John Keats. The Grasshopper. 

Alfred Tennyson. A Sea Shell. 

Leigh Hint. The Cricket and the Grasshopper. 

Jean LnGELOW. The Nest. 

Mary Howttt. The Woodmouse ; The Dog; Birds in Summer. 

Rennell Kodd. In an East End Market. 



Ralph Waldo Emerson. To the Humble Bee; Mountain and Squirrel. 

ELenry Wadswortb Longfellow. The Birds of Killingworth ; The Bell of Atri. 

John Greenleaf Whittier. Red Biding Hood. 

Oliyer Wendell Holmes. To a Caged Lion ; Sea Fowl; The Chambered Nautilus. 
( iii \ Thaxter. The Sandpiper; The Great Blue Heron. 
Bayard Taylor. To His Horse. ~ 



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BIRD DAY. 



BIED DAT. 

The United States Department of Agriculture issued in July, 1896, a circular sug- 
gesting that a "Bird Day,' 1 "to be devoted to instructing the children in the value of our 
native birds and the best means of protecting them, might with propriety be added to 
tlic school calendar." 

This circular. ( copies of which may be obtained by addressing United Stales Depart- 
ment of Agriculture Division of Biological Survey and asking for Circular No. 17,) 
contains a most valuable letter from J. Sterling Morton, Secretary of Agriculture, who 
gives good reasons for the establishment of "Bird Day" throughout the country. 
He says : — 

"The cause of bird protection is one that appeals to the best side of our natures. 
Let us yield to the appeal. Let us have a Bird Day — a day set apart from all the other 
days of the year to tell the children about the birds. But we must not stop here. We 
should strive continually to develop and intensify the sentiment of bird protection, not 
alone for the sake of preserving the birds, but also for the sake of replacing as far as 
possible the barbaric impulses inherent in child nature by the nobler impulses and 
aspirations that should characterize advanced civilization. 11 

Prof. C. A. Babcock, Superintendent of Schools, Oil City, Pa., originated "Bird 
Day" 1 and first celebrated it in the schools under his charge in May, 1894. He says : — 

" The preservation of the birds is not merely a matter of sentiment, or of education 
in that high and line feeling, kindness to all living things. It has a utilitarian side of 
vast extent, :t- broad as our boundless fields and our orchards 1 sweep. The birds are 
necessary to us. Only by their means can the insects which injure, and if not checked. 
destroy vegetation, be kept within bounds. . . 

"What is most needed is knowledge of the birds themselves, their modes of life, their 
curious ways, and their relation to the scheme of things. To know a bird is to love him. 
Birds are beautiful and interesting objects of study, and make appeals to children that 
are responded to with delight. 

"The general observance of a 'Bird Day 1 in our schools would probably do more 
to open thousands of young minds to the reception of bird lore than anything else that can 
be devised. The scattered interests of the children would thus be brought together, and 
fused into a large and compact enthusiasm, which would become the common property 
cf all. Zeal in a genuine cause is more contagious than a bad habit.' 1 

(179) 



BIRD DAY. 
Suggestions for Bird Day Program. 

Open with songs and have frequent songs during the exercises. 

Let teacher and children tell anecdotes about birds they have seen, and tell of feed- 
ing birds, etc. 

Describe birds feeding their young, etc. 

Essays should be written describing some of the insects injurious to fruit trees and 
the birds Which feed upon them. 

Tell what trees should be planted to attract the birds to our homes, and what trees 
should be planted to protect the fruit trees. For instance, it has been found that mulber- 
ry trees are preferred by some of the birds to the cultivated cherry, etc. 

There should be recitations and readings from prose writers and poets on the sub- 
ject of birds. 

Superintendent Babcock says: — "Many of our schools close their exercises by a 
trip to the woods to listen to the vesper concert of our feathered brothers." 



Interesting Ways to Study the Birds. 

The Journal of Education gives the following suggestions : 

Put up boxes for martins, bluebirds, and wrens. 

Fasten to the trees cups of bark containing seeds, grain, etc. ; tin cups holding 
sugar, syrup, and water, and nail up bones in the trees near your house. Watch for 
results and keep a record of them. In one instance sparrows were observed carry- 
ing hard crusts of bread to a little pool of water formed in a dent in a tin roof, to 
soften before attempting to eat them. 

An opera or field glass is a great aid in making observations. Note when the 
different birds arrive in the spring, making in this way a bird calendar. Notice also 
when the birds gather into flocks in the late summer or autumn, preparatory to taking 
their leave. 



(180) 



THE STUDY OF NATURE. 



THE STUDY OF NATURE. 

"All of you with children, and who have no need to count expense, or even if you 
have such need, take them somehow into the country among green grass and yellow 
wheat, among trees, by hills and streams, if you wish their highest education, that of the 
heart and the soul, to be accomplished. 

" Therein shall they find a secret — a knowledge not to be written, not to be found in 
books. They shall know the sun and the wind, the running water, and the breast of the 
broad earth. Under the green spray, among the hazel boughs where the nightingale 
sings, they shall find a secret, a feeling, a sense that fills the heart with an emotion nev- 
er to be forgotten. They will forget the books — they will never forget the grassy fields. 

" If you wish your children to think deep things, to know the holiest emotions, take 
them to the woods and hills, and give them the freedom of the meadows. 11 — Richard 
Jefferies. 

"Instead of teaching our children the lesson of the infinite beauty and sacredness of 
natural life, we deliberately send them out into the wild places of Nature, as youthful 
marauders and murderers, and then wonder that they grow up brutal, stupid, and un- 
feeling. . . . 

"They should be taught to cage and imprison no animal or bird, but to respect the 
freedom and self -development of all other sentient beings, even as they claim the like 
privilege for themselves. . . . 

"Boys and girls should be early initiated into those habits of quiet, observant, and 
loving watchfulness, by which the true nature-lover, as distinguished from the collecting 
scientist, is always able to win the confidence of nature, to learn the secret of field and 
forest with far more penetrating eye. They should feed the wild birds that flock to the 
gardens in winter-time, and then in summer they would have the full enjoyment of 
their song. 11 — Henry S. Salt. 

"Do not place in the hands of your child such toys as whips, guns, and swords, but 
teach him rather that useless wars and cruelty are crimes. Lead him to take pleasure in 
feeding the birds rather than in robbing their nests. There is no surer way to teach the 
child to be unselfish and thoughtful for others than to make him considerate of the 
feelings of his pets. 

/180 



////•: srihY or a.i 1 1 in-:. 

"(live your boy an opera-glass and Bend him Into the woods to study the patience, in- 
genuity, and industry of birds. Let him Learn to distinguish the Bong of one bird 
from another. Arouse his curiosity as to their habits, and give him the innocenl de- 
Light that the study oi Natural History is sure to bring into his Life. Teach him that it 

is cowardly to torture helpless birds. Let him learn of their value as insect eater-, and 

Show him that we need a great many more birds in our woods and near OUT homo than 
we now have. Take away the air-gun, and insist that the coming generation shall real- 
ize the sin of cruelty and the had tendency of any ad that gives the question of life or 
death into irresponsible hands. 

"Teach your child to love the woods and the fields, the (lower- and the birds, and to 
call his horse and his dog his friends, and you have added to his capacity for happiness 
a thousand fold." 



"The phenomena of free and happy life is a wonderful and beautiful study, and no 
lessons so effectively foster all that is good and noble in the human heart. In connec- 
tion with this, teach Kindness, Justice, and .Mercy to all Living creatures and you form a 
character approaching to the perfect man and woman. 11 — G. Fairchild Alh //. 



" Knowledge never learned of schools 
Of the wild bee's morning chase, 
Of the wild-flowers' time and place, 
Flight of fowl and habitude 
Of the tenants of the wood ; 
How the tortoise bears his shell; 
How the woodchuck digs his cell 
And the ground-mole makes his well ; 



How the robin feeds her young: 
How the oriole's nest is hung; 



Of the black wasp's cunning way, 

Mason of Ins walls of clay, 

And the architectural plans 

Of grey hornet artisans! " — Whittier, 



"There is a slight rustle among the bushes and the fern upon the mound. It is a rab- 
bit who has peeped forth into the sunshine. His eye open wide with wonder at the Bight 
of us; his nostrils work nervously a a he watches us narrowly. Bui in a little while the si- 
lence and stillness reaS8Ure him; he nibbles in a desultory way at the stray grasses on the 
mound, and finally ventures out into the meadow almost within reach of the hand. It i< 
so easy to make the acquaintance — to make friends with the children of Nature. From 
the tiniest insect upward they are so ready to dwell in sympathy with us — only hi' 
tender, quiet, considerate, in a word, gentlemanly, towards them ami they will freely 
wander around. 

"What wonderful patience the creatures called ' hm er ' exhibit ! Watch this small 
red ant traveling among the grass-blades. To it they are a- high as the crab-trees to us, 

(182) 



THE STUDY OF NATURE. 

and they are entangled and matted together as a forest overthrown by a tornado. The 
insect slowly overcomes all the difficulties of its route — now climbing over the creeping 
roots of the buttercups, now struggling under a fallen leaf, now getting up a bennet, up 
and down, making one inch forwards for three vertically, but never pausing, always on- 
wards at racing speed. . . . 

" lull of love and sympathy for this feeble ant climbing over grass and leaf, for yon- 
der nightingale pouring forth its song, feeling a community with the finches, with bird, 
with plant, with animal, and reverently studying all these and more — how is it possible 
for the heart while thus wrapped up to conceive the desire of crime? Forever anxious 
and laboring for perfection, shall the soul, convinced of the divinity of its work, halt and 
turn aside to fall into imperfection?" — Richard Jefferies. 



. . . . " Nature never did betray 
The heart that loved her ; 'tis her privilege, 
Through all the years of this our life, to lead 
From joy to joy : for she can so inform 
The mind that is within us, so impress 
With quietness and beauty, and so feed 
With lofty thoughts, that neither evil tongues, 
Rash judgments, nor the sneers of selfish men, 
Nor greetings where no kindness is, nor all 
The dreary intercourse of daily life, 
Shall e'er prevail against us or disturb 
Our cheerful faith, that all which we behold 
Is full of blessings."— Wordsworth. 



(183) 



"No longer now the winged inhabitants 

That in the woods their sweet lives sing away, 

Flee from the form of man. but gather round. 

And prune their feathers on the hands 

Which little children stretch in friendly sport 

Towards these dreadless partners of their play. 

All things are void of terror; man has lost 

His terrible prerogative, and stands 

An equal amidst equals — happiness 

And science dawn, though late, upon the earth." 

— Extract from Shelley's " Queen Mab. n 



(184) 



MUSIC IN NATURE. 



MUSIC IN" NATUEE. 

" The song of nature is forever, 
Her joyous voices falter never ; 
On hill and valley, near and far, 
Attendant her musicians are. 

From waterbrook or forest tree 
For aye comes gentle melody ; 
The very air is music blent, 
A universal instrument." 

" The very mice sing; the toads too; and the frogs make 'music on the waters. 1 
The summer grass about our feet is alive with little musicians. . . The little bird- 
songs are melodies, containing something of all we know of melody, and this in most 
exquisite forms. . . 

" They ( the birds ) are Nature's finest artists, whose lives and works are above the 
earth. They have not learned of us; it is our delight to learn of them. Myriads of 
these beautiful creatures, journeying thousands of miles over oceans and continents, 
much of the way by night — to avoid murderers ! — return, unfailing as the spring, prompt 
even to the day and hour, to build their cunning nests and rear their young in our or- 
chards and door-yards , to delight us with their beauty and grace of movement, and above, 
far above all, to pour over the world the glory of their song. He that hath ears to hear , 
let him hear. 

"Be the scientific solution what it may, whether or not 

"'Tis love creates their melody, and all 
This waste of music is the voice of love," 

we know that music is pleasurable to man, and its continuous presence throughout the 
animal kingdom indicates that it is pleasurable also to the beings beneath him. Why 
should not the subtile power of music extend from man down to the smallest creature ? 
The author of Job and Shakespeare record its effect on the horse, and similar testimony 
is to be met with in all literatures ancient and modern.' 1 

All the above is quoted from " Wood Xotes Wild " by Simeon Pease Cheney, edited by John J'ance Che- 
ney. Lee and Shepard, Publishers. 

(185) 



WTS1C l\ NATURE. 

" God of the Granite and the Kose! 

Soul of the Sparrow ami the l>ee! 

Tlu' mighty tide <>f Being flows 

Through countless channels, Lord, from Thee. 

It leaps to life in grass and Mowers, 

Through every grade of being runs, 

Till from Creation's radiant towers 

It's glory flames in stars and Buns." — Elizabeth DoU n. 



" Consider the marvellous life of a bird and the manner <>f its whole existence. . . 
Consider the powers of that little mind of which the inner light flashes from the round 
bright eye; the skill in building its home, in finding its food, in protecting its mate, iu 
serving its offspring, in preserving it- own existence, surrounded as it is on all Bides by 
the most rapacious enemies. 

f ' When left alone it is such a lovely little life — cradled amongsl the hawthorn buds, 
Bearching for aphidse amongst apple blossoms, drinking dew from the cup of a lily: a- 
wake when the grey light breaks in the east, throned on the topmost branch of a tree, 
3 winging with it in the sunshine, flying from it through the air: then the friendly quarrel 

with a neighbor overa worm or a berry : the joy of bearing gra eed to his mate where 

she sits low down amongst the docks and daisies : the triumph of -inning the prab 
sunshine or of moonlight: the merry, busy, useful days: the peaceful sleep, steeped in 
the scent of the closed flowers, with head under one wing and the leave- forming a green 
roof above." — Quida. 



" O birds, your perfect virtues bring, 

Your song, your forms, your rhythmic flight, 

Your manners for the heart's delight, 

Nestle in hedge, or barn, or roof. 

Here weave your chamber weather-proof. 

Forgive our harms, and condescend 

To man. as to a lubber friend. 

And. generous, teach his awkward race 

Courage and probit] ami grace."— Ralph Waldo Emerson. 



Tin. Summer Pool. 

"There is a 3inging in the summer air, 

The blue and brown moths flutter o'er the grass, 

The stubble bird is creaking in the wheat. 

And. perched upon tin- honeysuckle hedge, 



Mr sic IX NATURE. 

Pipes the green linnet. Oh ! the golden world — 

The star of life on every blade of grass, 

The motion and joy on every bough. 

The glad feast everywhere, for things that love 

The sunshine, and for things that love the shade." — Buchanan. 



"I have watched birds at their singing under many aud widely differing circum- 
stances, and I am sure that they express joyous anticipation, present content, and pleas- 
ant recollection, each as the mood moves, and all with equal ease." — M. Thompson. 



" The act of singing is evidently a pleasurable one ; and it probably serves as an 
outlet for superabundant nervous energy and excitement, just as dancing, singing, and 
field sports do with us."' — A. B. Wallace. 



"The bird upon the tree utters the meaning of the wind — a voice of the grass and 
wildtlower, words of the green leaf; they speak through that slender tone. Sweetness 
of dew and rifts of sunshine, the dark hawthorn touched with breadths of open bud, the 
odor of the air. the color of the daffodil — all that is delicious and beloved of spring- 
time are expressed in his song.*' — Pilchard Jefferies. 



(187) 



Musical Notes of Birds and Animals. 



'The Music of Nature," W. Gardiner. 

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Musical Notes of Birds and Animals. 



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(189) 



This way would I also sing, 

My dear little hillside neighbor! 
A tender carol of peace to bring 

To the sunburnt fields of labor 
Is better than making a loud ado ; 

Trill on, amid clover and yarrow! 
There's a heart-beat echoing for you, 

And blessing you, blitln liUU sparrow! 

Lucy Lakcom. 



(190) 



INDEX. 



PART I 



PAGE 

Anniversary Sons: 19 

Answer to a Child's Question ... 96 

April Song 186 

Arab's Farewell to His Favorite Steed, 

The 52 

Autumn Song 142 



The 



Things 



143 
73 
20 
86 
76 



Beautiful Woods 
Bee, The . . 
Be Kind to Livin; 
Bird Thoughts . " 
Bluebird. The . 

Brown Thrush, The 104 

Butterfly, To a 71 

Caged Bird's Lament, The 98 

Carnival of Spring 122 

Chanticleer 75 

Chick-a-de-dee 78 

Chipmunk. The 47 

Closing Hymn 155 

Constant Dove, The 93 

Cradle Tree-Top 82 

Cricket, The 72 

Cry for Liberty, A 85 

Cunning Bee 69 



Dare To Do Right .... 

Day's Eye, The 

Dicky-Birds 

Don't Kill the Birds .... 
Don't Rob the Birds, Boys . . 
Down in the Grass .... 

Each Little Flower that Opens 



24 

138 
80 
89 
99 

130 

124 



Faithful Little Bird, The 114 

Fatherland, The 154 

Finished Nest, A 103 



Gladly Lend a Hand ... 
God Bless the Little Children 
Grey Kitten, The . . . . , 



Hail to the Elm 

Happy Birds 

Heimdall 

He Liveth Long Who Liveth Well 

Hidden Treasures 

Home, Sweet Home 

Honest Old Toad, The .... 
Hope of the Nation, The . . . 

Humanity 

Humming Bird, The 



Lady-Bird, The 

Liberty, Love, and Peace 

Life in the Nest 

Lift Aloft Our Banner 

Lines to a Seabird 

Linnet, The 

Little Bird's Nest, The 

Little by Little 

Little Deeds of Kindness 

Little Gustava 

Little Hands 

Little Maiden and the Little Bird, The 

Little Mouse, A 

Little Sunbeam 

Loving-Kindness to All 

Lullaby 

Make the World More Bright . . . 
Marching 'Round the World . . . . 

Marching Song 

Marjorie 

Morning Light Is Breaking, The . . 

Mountain Goatherd, The 

My Cat and Dog 

My Neighbors » . 



PAGE 

38 
27 



140 

113 

22 

31 

135 

145 

50 

15 

13 

111 

74 

150 

115 

30 

88 

106 

116 

18 

16 

39 

35 

94 

49 

14 

36 

121; 
n 

17 
29 
95 

147 
64 
48 

100 



(191) 



INDEX. 



PAOl 

Nightingale, The 

North Wind Doth Blow, The .... 144 

Oh, Scatter Kind Words 23 

o. Painter of the Fruits and Flowers . 127 

Our Happy Secrel 110 

Our Native Land 149 

Over in the Meadow 42 

Praise -Tune! 128 

Redbreast, To a 79 

Ring the Bells of Mercy 31 

Robert of Lincoln 92 

Rose is Queen among the Flowers, The 25 

Sing Always 21 

Snow-Birds, The 112 

Song of the Bee, The 70 

Soul: of Liberty 146 

Son« of the Dancing Waves, The . . 118 

Sparrows, The . 108 

Speak Kindly 2(5 

Spring Blossoms 132 



PA(1E. 

Spring Soult 

Star of Mercy 28 

Snmmer Morning, A 189 

Summer Things ........ 125 

Summer Woods 65 

Three Kittens 62 

To Mother Fairie 32 

To Work,— Do Your Best 12 

True Freedom 148 

Up in the Morning 134 

Victory is Nigh 34 

Watchword, The 152 

Water-Drinkers, The 67 

Woodman, Spare That Tree .... 131 

Woodmouse. The 66 

Work, for the Night Is Coming . . . 37 

Worship of Nature, The 117 

Wounded Curlew, The 84 

Yellow Bird 87 



PART II. 



Bands of Mercy 161 

Bands of Mercy in Schools .... 163 
Band of Mercy Entertainment, Outline 

of . . 166 

Band of Mercy Pledge 162 

Bird Day 179 

Bird Day Program, Suggestions for . 180 

Birds, Interesting Ways to Study the . 180 

Humane Education 157 



Methods, — Quotation from M. deSailly 
Musical Notes of Birds and Animals . 



159 

188 



Music in Nature 185 



Poems by Standard Authors, List of 
Publications, List of 



178 
164 



Quotations Concerning the Importance 

of Humane Education 157 

Study of Nature, The 181 

What Has Been Done in the United 

States and in England 160 



(192) 



SONGS OF HAPPY LIFE. 

Board Covers, ( Nile Green ) . 30 cents. 
Japanese Sea-Moss Covers . 40 cents. 
Postage 8 cents. 

Special price to Boards of Education, 
and by the quantity. 

( Correspondence solicited.) 



ART AND NATURE STUDY PUB. CO. 
Providence, R. I. 



Pictures suitable for Schools, Homes and 
Bands of Mercy. 



Reproductions from photographs. 
LOVING PLAYMATES. 

(This picture represents a Child and I><>g.) 

SIZC 26 X 32 INCHES 

Single copy $1.50 

Price per dozen 12.00 

For Schools and Bands of Mercy, single 

copies, wholesale price, each . 1. 00 

Packing and Postage . . . .15 

FRIENDS. 

(This picture represents Three Kittens lying down 
together.) 

SIZE 16 r 28 INCHES 

Single copy $1.00 

Price per dozen 9.00 

For Schools and Bands of Mercy, single 

copies, wholesale price, each . .75 

Packing and Postage .... .10 

A circular with small sample pictures of the 
above will be sent on receipt of one cent postage 
stamp. 

Send postage stamps or Post Office order payable to 

Art and Nature Study 

Publishing Co., 

Providence. R. I